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Viewing the contents of an RPM

Posted on 2003-10-27
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Last Modified: 2013-11-13
At times I would like to know what changes an RPM will make to my system ahead of time. I would like to run RPM with the right switches (if they exist) so it will show me what files it will intall and where. Maybe it will put one file in /etc and create a new directory under /usr with five files, and update an existing file in /usr/bin. That's the kind of thing I would like to be able to figure out.
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Question by:jbbarnes
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larsra99 earned 50 total points
ID: 9630123
rpm -qpl package.rpm

should give you a list of all files that will be installed from the RPM

rpm -qipl package.rpm

if you want to see the package info as well.

-Lars
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by:HalldorG
ID: 9630126
rpm -qlp  package.rpm will list out the content

rpm -Fa package.rpm will freshen the rpm package if you already have installed an older version

rpm -qi  will give you info
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