protected or private constructors ....

Hi C++ Experts,

   Is there any specific reason that we want to make the constructors private of protected ? In either case, how do we create objects of the class ? Is that trut that we can not use "A a ;" or
"new A" to create objects in these two cases ???
   Thanks.
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meow00Asked:
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DexstarCommented:
meow00:

> Is there any specific reason that we want to make the constructors private of
> protected ? In either case, how do we create objects of the class ?

The only reason I can think of to make a constructor private is if you do not want that object created.  For example, if you have a class with ONLY static functions, there is no need to create an instance of that class, so you should make the constructor "private", like this:

     class CTools
     {
     private:
          CTools()     { };  // Keep the class from being created

     // Operations
     public:
         static int DoSomething();
         static int DoSomethingElse();
     };

PROTECTED constructors are useful if you FORCE a class to be a base class, and prevent it from being used directly.

For example:
     class CBase
     {
     protected:
          CBase()     { }
     };

     class CDerived : public CBase
     {
     public:
          CDerived()     {     };
     };

In that case, you wouldn't be able to create an object of type "CBase" because the constructor is protected.  However, you can create an object of type "CDerived" because CDerived is based on CBase, and can access the protected constructor.

Does that make sense?

Hope that helps,
Dex*
0
meow00Author Commented:
I see ....... so is that true we can construct a Base object (using the protected or private constructor) from it's friend class ? Is this something good to do ? or better not do it ?

thanks.
0
DexstarCommented:
meow00:

> I see ....... so is that true we can construct a Base object (using the
> protected or private constructor) from it's friend class ? Is this something
> good to do ? or better not do it ?

What friend class are you talking about?  In theory, you could make a friend class and that friend class would have access to the protected/private constructors.  But, in general, you shouldn't use "friends", unless there is no other way to do it.

You should only use protected/private constructors if there is a good reason to do so, like in the examples I gave you already.  I can't think of a situation where it would be valuable to use a "friend".

Dex*
0

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ExceterCommented:
>> Is there any specific reason that we want to make the constructors private of protected ?

Yes there is. A protected constructor can only be called from within a derived class. This is usefull if you have a base class that you want to inherit from but that you do not want an instances of it to be created explicitly. For example,

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

using namespace std;

class test1
{
    protected:
        test1() { cout << "test1 constructor called." << endl; }
        ~test1() { cout << "test1 destructor called." << endl; }
};

class test2 : test1
{
    public:
        test2() { cout << "test2 constructor called." << endl; }
        ~test2() { cout << "test2 destructor called." << endl; }
};

int main()
{
    test2 t;

    return 0;
}

-- output --
test1 constructor called.
test2 constructor called.
test2 destructor called.
test1 destructor called.

Take notice that the constructor in the base class is called before the constructor of the derived class and that conversly, the derived class' destructor is called before the base class' destructor.

As for private constructors, you can use them to create a singleton class. That is, a class of which there can only be instance of at any one time. This is a rather rare circumstance where you need to have only one instance of the class in existence. You do this by making the constructor private. You then have a static member function that returns a reference to the only instance of the class. If a class instance does not exist, the function creates one.

Cheers!
Exceter
0
DexstarCommented:
Whoa...  Never assisted myself before!  Cool!  :)
0
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