return type of a function ?

To C++ Experts,
    We can return a reference, a point, or a copy of the object from a function. The object can also be const. Is it illegal to return a static object ?
If so, when is it used ?
    i.e.
    class A{} ;
    const A* func(); //ok (right ?)
    static A* func(); // is this allowed ? if so, when do we use it ?
   
Thanks a lot !
   
LVL 1
meow00Asked:
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beavis_shenzhenConnect With a Mentor Commented:
static A* func();
the keyword "static" is for func() , not for "A*".
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rstaveleyCommented:
> static A* func(); // is this allowed ? if so, when do we use it ?

This doesn't necessarily return a pointer to a static object. There is no way of indicating whether the object pointed to is in static memory or in the free store. There is nothing wrong with returning a pointer to a static object.

Having this declared outside a class is deprecated use of the keyword static. It is equivalent to putting a function into an unnamed namespace making it visible only to the module in which it is defined.

 i.e.
 
 namespace {
 A* func();
 }

Having this declared within a class means that the function may be called without instantiating the class, because the function does not use any instance variables.

 i.e.

 class X {...};
 class foo {
 ....
 static X* func(); /* Returns a pointer to an instance of X, but doesn't make use of any of the non-static class members of foo in doing so */
 };
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gdeanConnect With a Mentor Commented:
class A
{
public:
     class A{} ;
    static A* func(){return Aptr;};
private:
     static A* Aptr;
};

A* A::Aptr=NULL;

This is an example of returning a static data member,  as beavis said statis refers to the function not the return type.   Statis simply means that it exists at runtime.  In this example you could invoke the function as A::func(), without having created an A object.  Also it may be worth noting that, any static data members in the class will be shared between all the objects of the class.  The most common example is a counter of objects.

class webpages
{
public:
     webpages(){++num;};
     ~webpages(){--num;};
     static unsigned long getNum(){return num;};
private:
     static unsigned long num;
};

unsigned long webpages::num=0;

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
if you create say 10 webpage objects in your program,  webpages::getNum() will return 10.  if you then destroy 5 of them webpages::getNum() will return 5.


Im not sure if this is what you were asking, but it sounded like you were a little bit confused about what exactly static means.  Hope this clears some things up.

0
 
meow00Author Commented:
Thanks for the answers and sorry for the late response, as I was out of town for a while.
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