Static vs. dynamic IP's

I have a domain with Win 2k Server, and Win 2k Pro Clients.
The computers take a while (maybe 2, 3 minutes) to log to the server.
Some computers "see" the server in "Network Places" but can't register to log in the server.
Is this because I'm using dynamic IP's?

What are the main differences between static and dynamic in ease of use and performance?
pedropiedadeAsked:
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JFrederick29Commented:
No this is not an issue with using dynamically assigned IP addresses.

Dynamically assigned IP addresses are handled by a DHCP server.  Static addresses are manually entered into your network properties on each individual PC.  DHCP is much easier if you have a large number of client computers as it will assign these addresses automatically.  You would have to walk to each computer and manually assign the IP address if statically assigning IP addresses.

Use DHCP whenever possible on client computers.  Statically assign IP addresses to servers, printers and other devices that need to keep the same IP address always.

Whether you use dynamic or static IP addresses, it has no bering on network performance.  DHCP simply eases administration.

Your problem sounds more like a DNS issue...
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pedropiedadeAuthor Commented:
So, any ideas on how to solve the "DNS issue"?
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JFrederick29Commented:
Check to make sure the IP address of your Windows 2000 DNS server is the first entry in your servers TCP/IP DNS properties.  Your DNS is probably not configured properly and your clients are using Netbios to resolve the names which takes much longer.  I would try re-setting up your DNS configuration...create a forward lookup zone for your domain and if attached to the Internet, set your ISP's DNS servers as forwarders for external resolution...

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q237675
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oBdACommented:
This is definitely a DNS issue. Check out the document below.
The short version:
Make sure that on your DC there's only one DNS server entry, and it points to itself.
On your clients, make sure there is *only* one DNS server entry pointing to your DC (unless you have two DCs, then you can of course enter both IPs ...).
Delete the "." zone in your DNS to enable external DNS resolution (or, as JFrederick29 said, configure forwarders).

Frequently Asked Questions About Windows 2000 DNS and Windows Server 2003 DNS
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=291382
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oBdACommented:
Oh, as for the ease of administration:
Stay with DHCP for your clients; you'll notice that to change/correct the DNS settings, you only have to edit the settings on your DHCP server, instead of going to every workstation to change the TCP/IP properties ...
If you're not doing it yet, it might be useful to work with reservations, so you'll have "static" addresses, but still easy administration.
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pedropiedadeAuthor Commented:
I set the server IP to static and now it won't start...
It stays on "... network connections" forever (hours) when it's starting.
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oBdACommented:
Try hitting F8 during start, choosing the "last known good" configuration to boot.
Could it be that you were not using DHCP at all but APIPA?
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