Unix shell script question (goto - label)

I am a novice shell script programmer, so be gentle!

Currently I have a automated process that uses about 10 separate Bourne shell scripts... One will execute, then fire off the next and so forth.
I want to consolidate the scripts into one, but I need to use some type of "goto" command to a label inside the script. I did not find any "goto" command in my Unix Shell programming book. I know that the "csh" uses "goto", but I was told not to use "csh".

Any suggestions?
rlburrisAsked:
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yuzhCommented:
If you want to merge all the scripts in one piece, define each script as a function of your
main script.
just make sure that you declear the fuction at the beginning of your script

eg.

a litter script:

#!/bin/ksh
# log something to a log file
LOGFILE=/var/log/mylog
echo "$1" >>$LOGFILE 2>&1
# END


Now we, write a main script and modify the above script as a function.

eg:

#!/bin/ksh
# VAR declarations
LOGFILE=/var/log/mylog

#........

# Functions

Log ()
{
  echo "$1" >>$LOGFILE 2>&1
}

# start of the main script
# do some thing

# use the function
Log "Subject: SUCCESS!: ${DAY} Backup log for SQL Server"

# do other things

exit

# END OF SCRIPT

Hope that it can help.

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rlburrisAuthor Commented:
Yuzh,
      Please explain (break down) the following command:
echo "$1" >> $LOGFILE 2>&1

Also when you use the function Log in your example... Does "Subject:SUCCESS!" writes to the LOGFILE?

yuzhCommented:
Yes.
echo "$1" >> $LOGFILE

willl write "Subject: SUCCESS!: ${DAY} Backup log for SQL Server" to $LOGFILE
in this case is /var/log/mylog (I defined it before the function)

echo "$1" >> $LOGFILE 2>&1

will write "Subject: SUCCESS!: ${DAY} Backup log for SQL Server" + any
error message to the login file (I redirect stderr to stdin)
rlburrisAuthor Commented:
Thanks yuzh!!!
yuzhCommented:
You are welcome.

Cheers!
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