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Shared Folders requires users to be added as Admins.

Posted on 2003-10-30
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Last Modified: 2013-12-04
I have created a shared folder on a Win2000Pro machine, and granted Full Access to certain users on the Domain on which this workstation resides.  However, even though those users have been given access to this folder, I find that they cannot access it unless I first add them as Administrators of this machine.  Adding them as anything other than Admins does not work, they get an "insufficient priviledges" error message.  This makes no sense.  What's the point of having shared folder permissions when users have to be fully priviledged Admins anyway?
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Question by:beachbt
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12 Comments
 
LVL 15

Expert Comment

by:Rob Stone
ID: 9650931
Is it on a NTFS volume?  If so, check the Security tab.

Also make sure nothing is set to deny in both sharing and security.

You shouldn't have to add them to the local administrators group to access that share.  Did you add a group from the domain or just the user's id?
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LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:Kubrik
ID: 9650969
What "filesystem" permissions are set on your shared folder?

Remember that if you grant full "network" access to a user and that user has NO filesystem access permission on that folder , he will never succeed in opening it.

I prefer give full network access and play with filesystem permission.
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Author Comment

by:beachbt
ID: 9651345
Not sure exactly what the difference is between "Filesystem" and "Network" access.   I went to the folder in Windows Explorer, right-clicked, selected "Sharing", gave it a name, and clicked on the permissions button.  I then clicked "Add", located the desired users in the appropriate domain, and added them, making sure the correct access permissions were checked.  Yes, this is an NFTS volume.
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LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:Kubrik
ID: 9651426
>>  I went to the folder in Windows Explorer, right-clicked, selected "Sharing",

Select Properties, then security and watch userlist.
Which user is listed? and which permission?
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LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:ocon827679
ID: 9652637
Sounds like you have conflicting permissions.  You set the share permissions to allow these users access.  What have you set the file permissions to be?  If you have only administrator set to full on the file permissions and no other group(s) identified AND you have administrators and this group of users set to Full on the share permissions, then the users must be in the administrators group.  Remember that when you use Share permissions and File permissions together, then the most restrictive permissions are utilized.  
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Author Comment

by:beachbt
ID: 9653047
This is where I am confused.  There are no "File Permissions."  I only set up permissions on the Folder.  The files in this folder change constantly.  Where would I go to set "File Permissions?"
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LVL 13

Accepted Solution

by:
ocon827679 earned 63 total points
ID: 9653075
Go to the folder level.  Right-click on the the folder and select Properties.  If you are using NTFS there will be a Security tab.  You will see the file permissions set there.
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Author Comment

by:beachbt
ID: 9653267
Kubrik,

>>>  I went to the folder in Windows Explorer, right-clicked, selected "Sharing",
>
>Select Properties, then security and watch userlist.
>Which user is listed? and which permission?

Under Properties/Security, there is only one entity listed.  Everybody.  They have full control.
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LVL 15

Assisted Solution

by:Rob Stone
Rob Stone earned 63 total points
ID: 9656297
Try creating another shared folder and see if that has the same affect.  If possible try it on a different volume too.
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LVL 1

Assisted Solution

by:Kubrik
Kubrik earned 62 total points
ID: 9656380
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LVL 1

Assisted Solution

by:Pir84free
Pir84free earned 62 total points
ID: 9662892
Sure it is Win2kPro ?

It surely sounds like  ocon827679 is right on target.
In order to share correctly, you must evaluate both the sharing permissions along with the security rights for the files or folders.  Windows from 2000 on uses the most restrictive / combination of these rights to determine if a user has which rights to the file or folder.  To determine a users permissions, it takes the most restrictive permissions and a combination of the rights from the user and all of the groups that the user belongs to.

Another point- the folder should have other rights also. Typically, SYSTEM has full control  And the Administrators group should have full control. Maybe your issue is the lack of these rights. Add them and see if it straightens out the directory.

Just a thought.
0
 

Author Comment

by:beachbt
ID: 10743327
Though none of the answers has completely resolved this issue, I have split the points amongst all, since the discussion was helpful.
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