What's a UNIX domain?

If you can just confirm that a UNIX domain is the set of computers served by one master NIS master server, you win the points.

If this isn't true, you'll have to earn the points by setting me straight.
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rfr1tzAsked:
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jlevieCommented:
I don't believe there is any such thing as a "UNIX domain", at least with respect to a collection of computers. There is the concept of an NIS or NIS+ domain, which is a named set of NIS maps or NIS+ tables. n both cases there will be a single master server and possibly one or more slave/replica servers.
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svenkarlsenCommented:
There is a number of known domains today, even though not all are specifically called 'domains': internet (TCP/IP), Novell(IPX), Unix(UDP), Mac(?).

UNIX Domain is used for interprocess communication on localhost and uses proprietary protocols.


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GnsCommented:
> UNIX Domain
No, that would be a socket of AF_UNIX "type" or similar (Adress Family UNIX...). Not a domain. Other than in a very loosly held sense of the concept of a domain:-).
Jim is quite right.

-- Glenn
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svenkarlsenCommented:
Hi Glenn,

agree that it relates to sockets and not computers, but the definition is 'domain' not 'family' (as in: int socket(int domain, int type, int protocol)).

Newer mind, - I'm not trying to be smart, I'm sure you're better versed in these things than me.

My reply was an attempt to say:

The term 'domain' is used in many different concepts. Some relate to groups of computers (e.g. Microsoft NT domains, internet domains, etc.). The only place where I have met the 'Unix Domain' used consistently is in relation to streams or sockets on localhost.
There is (to the best of my knowledge) no definition of any realm comprised by a group of computers which use the term 'Unix Domain', although sales- & marketing-persons from ISPs and suchlike sometimes use the term synonymous with 'Internet Domain' when talking about domain names.


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GnsCommented:
True. Even very true. Especially the part about "domain" being a very "battered" and missused term.

-- Glenn
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GnsCommented:
Which just goes further to prove my initial statement;-). And has next to nothing to do with the initial question:-).
(The "AF_" stands for "Address Family", and the "domain" agrument should be interpreted in that sense... And is just a synonym to AF in this case. Mixing in two "nominators" for the same thing has never been a good thing. Even if it's "as old as sockets";).
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