Routers Vs Firewall

subnet A ----------router---------firewall--------------boundary router (in subnet B)


I've been given a class C address..

subnet A is x.y.z.a/25
subnet B is x.y.z.128/27

wat is the recommended IP addresses for the router, firewall and boundary router?

Wat are the interfaces used by the router, firewall and boundary router.

I'm thinking of something like this, but I'm not sure if I'm correct.

router interface
x.y.z.2

Firewall interface
x.y.z.130
x.y.z.1

Boundary router interface
x.y.z.129

Is this correct?

also, how would the routing table for the router and boundary router look like?
does firewalls have routing tables?


thanks, pretty new in this...

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kebeenAsked:
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MaxQCommented:
Is there a reason to have a separate router bordering each subnet in addition to
having the firewall between them?  It's possible this design could be simplified
somewhat...firewalls can indeed act like routers (and routers like firewalls, just
to confuse matters).  Anyhow, going with the assumption that this arrangement
is necessary:

Redrawing with some labels (they are probably not all ethernet, this is just for illustration):

NetworkA-----[e0[RouterA]e1]-----[e0[firewall]e1]-----[e0[RouterB]e1]----NetworkB

Arranged this way, you actually have four networks, not two.  Since routing decisions
are made based on IP, those networks generally need to have distinct numbers (there
might be a way to do this with unnumbered interfaces, but let's leave that for now).
The good news is that the little point-to-point networks on either side of the firewall
don't need to be seen by anyone except the routers, so you can use private addresses
and not waste any of your class C.

RouterA:
 e0 x.y.z.1/25 (can be anything from 1 to 126; most pick the lowest or highest number for the router)
 e1 192.168.1.1/30
 routes:
  x.y.z.128/27 to 192.168.1.2

firewall:
 e0 192.168.1.2/30
 e1 192.168.2.2/30
 routes:
  x.y.z.0/25 to 192.168.1.1
  x.y.z.128/27 to 192.168.2.1

RouterB:
 e0 192.168.2.1/30
 e1 x.y.z.129/27
 routes:
  x.y.z.0/25 to 192.168.2.2

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