What would the Web be like if there were no limit to bandwidth?

What would the Web (or Internet) be like if there were no limit to bandwidth?
akhilrrAsked:
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qwaleteeCommented:
I don't think it would be much different than today!

There is so much underused backbone capacity, it is ridiculous.  Bandwidth constraints are typically at the POP or between smal ISPs and backbone providers.

Lag will also remain an issue forever, unless they develop warp science.
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akhilrrAuthor Commented:
Thanks. But, can you please elaborate it?

Regards,
akhilrr
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akhilrrAuthor Commented:
Hellow,

Thanks a lot. Still I am not clear. Can you please explain it in detail? How we can say that "so much underused backbone capacity"?

Also, what are the current bandwidth problems for the ISPs and POP?

If there is no bandwidth problem, then what would be future of Web?

Thanks and Regards
Akhilrr
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qwaleteeCommented:
DUring the telecom/internet/dot-com boom period, the main telecom carriers (WorldCom, AT&T, BT, etc.) laid hundreds of thousands of fiber to satisfy the expected explosion in demand for data services, primarily Internet usgae.

It never happened.

So, there is an enormous amount of "unlit fiber," out there.   Only a fraction of the new fiber ever came on-line, and is rarely used to capacity.

So, there's plenty of currently-available badnwidth, and an enormous aount of bandwidth that could be added very cheap;y (by lighting up the dark fiber).

Individual ISPs can run into bandwidth problems if there is a surge in demand beyond the capacity of its connnection to a backbone provider.  Even more so for individual companies -- for example, if you own a small business, and get a 1.5mbps DSL line, you may run into trouble if you expand quickly, or users access the internet in unforeseen ways (e.g., p2p).
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