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Winsows 2003 Name Servers

Posted on 2003-11-03
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Hi

I have a colocation server with winsdows 2003.

I want to create my own DNS server on the server so i can manage the DNS of my domains.

But i havent got any idea of how to go about doing this on windows. I have installed DNS on Windows. I think i have to install Active directory as well but dont know how to do that.

Would appreciate if any one can help me setup DNS server.

Thanks
David



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Question by:iam_david_lee
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by:Pete Long
ID: 9670416
Before You Start
Before you start to configure your DNS, you must gather some basic information. Internic must approve some of this information for use on the Internet, but if you are configuring this server for internal use only, you can decide what names and IP addresses to use.

You must have the following information:
Your domain name (approved by Internic).
The IP address and host name of each server that you want to provide name resolution for.
Note: The servers may be your mail servers, public access servers, FTP servers, WWW servers, and others.

Before you configure your computer as a DNS, verify that the following conditions are true:
Your operating system is configured correctly. In the Windows Server 2003 family, the DNS service depends on the correct configuration of the operating system and its services, such as TCP/IP. If you have a new installation of a Windows Server 2003 operating system, then you can use the default service settings. You do not have to take additional action.
You have allocated all the available disk space.
All the existing disk volumes use the NTFS file system. FAT32 volumes are not secure, and they do not support file and folder compression, disk quotas, file encryption, or individual file permissions
back to the top
Install DNS
Open Windows Components Wizard. To do so, use the following steps:
Click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Add or Remove Programs.
Click Add/Remove Windows Components.
In Components, select the Networking Services check box, and then click Details.
InSubcomponents of Networking Services, select the Domain Name System (DNS) check box, click OK, and then click Next.
If you are prompted, in Copy files from, type the full path of the distribution files, and then click OK.
back to the top
Configure DNS
Start the Configure Your Server Wizard. To do so, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Configure Your Server Wizard.
On the Server Role page, click DNS server, and then click Next.
On the Summary of Selections page, view and confirm the options that you have selected. The following items should appear on this page:
Install DNS
Run the Configure a DNS Wizard to configure DNS
If the Summary of Selections page lists these two items, click Next. If the Summary of Selections page does not list these two items, click Back to return to the Server Role page, click DNS, and then click Next.
When the Configure Your Server Wizard installs the DNS service, it first determines whether the IP address for this server is static or is configured automatically. If your server is currently configured to obtain its IP address automatically, the Configuring Components page of the Windows Components Wizard prompts you to configure this server with a static IP address. To do so:
In the Local Area Connection Properties dialog box, click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click Properties.
In the Internet Protocols (TCP/IP) Properties dialog box, click Use the following IP address, and then type the static IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway for this server.
In Preferred DNS, type the IP address of this server.
In Alternate DNS, type the IP address of the DNS that your ISP or central office hosts.
When you finish setting up the static addresses for your DNS, click OK, and then click Close.
After you click Close, the Configure a DNS Server Wizard starts. In the wizard, follow these steps:
On the Select Configuration Action page, select the Create a forward lookup zone check box, and then click Next.
To specify that this DNS hosts a DNS zone that contains DNS resource records for your network resources, on the Primary Server Location page, click This server maintains the zone, and then click Next.
On the Zone Name page, in Zone name, specify the name of the DNS zone for your network, and then click Next. The name of the zone is the same as the name of the DNS domain for your small organization or branch office.
On the Dynamic Update page, click Allow both nonsecure and secure dynamic updates, and then click Next. This makes sure that the DNS resource records for the resources in your network update automatically.
On the Forwarders page, click Yes, it should forward queries to DNS servers with the following IP addresses, and then click Next. When you select this configuration, you forward all DNS queries for DNS names outside your network to a DNS at either your ISP or central office. Type one or more IP addresses that either your ISP or central office DNS servers use.
On the Completing the Configure a DNS Wizard page of the Configure a DNS Wizard, you can click Back to change any of the settings. To apply your selections, click Finish.
After you finish the Configure a DNS Wizard, the Configure Your Server Wizard displays the This Server is Now a DNS Server page. To review all the changes that you made to your server in the Configure Your Server Wizard or to make sure that a new role was installed successfully, click Configure Your Server log. The Configure Your Server Wizard log is located at %systemroot%\Debug\Configure Your Server.log. To close the Configure Your Server Wizard, click Finish

From KB814591
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by:iam_david_lee
ID: 9670905
hi
thanks for the reply

i am just configuring it now but when i goto Configure Your Server Wizard ansd select DNS Server it says its already installed and does not give me a chance to configure it.

Do i remove it and install it again or is there another way of getting to the DNS configuration sections.

Thanks
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Author Comment

by:iam_david_lee
ID: 9671102
hi

another quick question where do i add all my domains.

thanks
David
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Pete Long earned 250 total points
ID: 9671367
To Install the DNS service

DNS Is a windows componant add it as follows.
Click Start, point to Settings, and click Control Panel.
Double click Add or Remove Programs, and then click Add/Remove Windows Components.
In Components, select the Networking Services check box, and then click Details.
In Subcomponents of Networking Services, select the Domain Name System (DNS) checkbox, click OK, and then click Next.
If prompted, in Copy files from, type the full path to the distribution files and then click OK. The required files will be copied to your hard disk.

Installing and configuring a DNS server in Win2K (Screenshots)
http://techrepublic.com.com/5100-6268-1033115.html

Configuring DNS

After installing DNS, you can find the DNS console from Start | Programs | Administrative Tools | DNS. Windows 2000 provides a wizard to help configure your DNS.

When configuring your DNS server, you must be familiar with the following concepts:

Forward lookup zone
Reverse lookup zone
Zone types

A forward lookup zone is simply a way to resolve host names to IP addresses. A reverse lookup zone allows a DNS server to discover the DNS name of the host. Basically, it is the exact opposite of a forward lookup zone. A reverse lookup zone is not required, but it is easy to configure and will allow for your Windows 2000 Server to have full DNS functionality.

When selecting a DNS zone type, you have the following options: Active Directory (AD) Integrated, Standard Primary, and Standard Secondary. AD Integrated stores the database information in AD and allows for secure updates to the database file. This option will appear only if AD is configured. If it is configured and you select this option, AD will store and replicate your zone files.

A Standard Primary zone stores the database in a text file. This text file can be shared with other DNS servers that store their information in a text file. Finally, a Standard Secondary zone simply creates a copy of the existing database from another DNS server. This is primarily used for load balancing.

To open the DNS server configuration tool:
See http://techrepublic.com.com/5100-6268_11-1033115-2.html

Select DNS from the Administrative Tools folder to open the DNS console.
Highlight your computer name and choose Action | Configure The Server to launch the Configure DNS Server Wizard.
Click Next and choose the appropriate Root Server.
Click Next and then click Yes to create a forward lookup zone.
Select the appropriate radio button to install the desired Zone Type.
Click Next and type the name of the zone you are creating.
Click Next and then click Yes to create a reverse lookup zone.
Repeat Step 5.
Click Next and enter the information to identify the reverse lookup zone.
Click Next and review your selections.
Click Finish.

Managing DNS records
see http://techrepublic.com.com/5100-6268_11-1033115-3.html

You have now installed and configured your first DNS server, and you’re ready to add records to the zone(s) you created. There are various types of DNS records available. Many of them you will never use. We’ll be looking at these commonly used DNS records:

Start of Authority (SOA)
Name Servers
Host (A)
Pointer (PTR)
Canonical Name (CNAME) or Alias
Mail Exchange (MX)

***Start of Authority (SOA) record***
The Start of Authority (SOA) resource record is always first in any standard zone. The Start Of Authority (SOA) tab allows you to make any adjustments necessary. You can change the primary server that holds the SOA record, and you can change the person responsible for managing the SOA. Finally, one of the most important features of Windows 2000 is that you can change your DNS server configuration without deleting your zones and having to re-create the wheel

***Name Servers***
Name Servers specify all name servers for a particular domain. You set up all primary and secondary name servers through this record.

To create a Name Server, follow these steps:

Select DNS from the Administrative Tools folder to open the DNS console.
Expand the Forward Lookup Zone.
Right-click on the appropriate domain and choose Properties.
Select the Name Servers tab and click Add.
Enter the appropriate FQDN Server name and IP address of the DNS server you want to add.


Managing DNS records
You have now installed and configured your first DNS server, and you’re ready to add records to the zone(s) you created. There are various types of DNS records available. Many of them you will never use. We’ll be looking at these commonly used DNS records:

Start of Authority (SOA)
Name Servers
Host (A)
Pointer (PTR)
Canonical Name (CNAME) or Alias
Mail Exchange (MX)

***Start of Authority (SOA) record***
The Start of Authority (SOA) resource record is always first in any standard zone. The Start Of Authority (SOA) tab allows you to make any adjustments necessary. You can change the primary server that holds the SOA record, and you can change the person responsible for managing the SOA. Finally, one of the most important features of Windows 2000 is that you can change your DNS server configuration without deleting your zones and having to re-create the wheel


***Name Servers***
Name Servers specify all name servers for a particular domain. You set up all primary and secondary name servers through this record.

To create a Name Server, follow these steps:

Select DNS from the Administrative Tools folder to open the DNS console.
Expand the Forward Lookup Zone.
Right-click on the appropriate domain and choose Properties.
Select the Name Servers tab and click Add.
Enter the appropriate FQDN Server name and IP address of the DNS server you want to add.


***Host (A) records***
A Host (A) record maps a host name to an IP address. These records help you easily identify another server in a forward lookup zone. Host records improve query performance in multiple-zone environments, and you can also create a Pointer (PTR) record at the same time. A PTR record resolves an IP address to a host name.

To create a Host record:

Select DNS from the Administrative Tools folder to open the DNS console.
Expand the Forward Lookup Zone and click on the folder representing your domain.
From the Action menu, select New Host.
Enter the Name and IP Address of the host you are creating.
Select the Create Associated Pointer (PTR) Record check box if you want to create the PTR record at the same time. Otherwise, you can create it later.
Click the Add Host button.
 
***Pointer (PTR) records***
A Pointer (PTR) record creates the appropriate entry in the reverse lookup zone for reverse queries. As you saw in Figure H, you have the option of creating a PTR record when creating a Host record. If you did not choose to create your PTR record at that time, you can do it at any point.

To create a PTR record:

Select DNS from the Administrative Tools folder to open the DNS console.
Choose the reverse lookup zone where you want your PTR record created.
From the Action menu, select New Pointer.
Enter the Host IP Number and Host Name.
Click OK.

***Canonical Name (CNAME) or Alias records***
A Canonical Name (CNAME) or Alias record allows a DNS server to have multiple names for a single host. For example, an Alias record can have several records that point to a single sever in your environment. This is a common approach if you have both your Web server and your mail server running on the same machine.

To create a DNS Alias:

Select DNS from the Administrative Tools folder to open the DNS console.
Expand the Forward Lookup Zone and highlight the folder representing your domain.
From the Action menu, select New Alias.
Enter your Alias Name.
Enter the fully qualified domain name (FQDN).
Click OK.

***Mail Exchange (MX) records***
Mail Exchange records help you identify mail servers within a zone in your DNS database. With this feature, you can prioritize which mail servers will receive the highest priority. Creating MX records will help you keep track of the location of all of your mail servers.

To create a Mail Exchange (MX) record:

Select DNS from the Administrative Tools folder to open the DNS console.
Expand the Forward Lookup Zone and highlight the folder representing your domain.
From the Action menu, select New Mail Exchanger.
Enter the Host Or Domain.
Enter the Mail Server and Mail Server Priority.
Click OK.


*****Links and Further Reading*****

NT4 How to Install and Configure Microsoft DNS Server
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;172953

HOW TO: Install Network Services Such as WINS and DNS in Windows 2000
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;261321

HOW TO: Install and Configure DNS Server in Windows Server 2003
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;814591

Active Directory and DNS
Why needs Windows 2000 DNS?
http://www.windows-expert.net/Common/en/Articles/active-directory-and-dns.asp

Install DNS on Additional Domain Controllers
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/treeview/default.asp?url=/technet/prodtechnol/windowsserver2003/proddocs/deployguide/dssbe_upnt_fkua.asp

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