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Different internal and external IP address

Posted on 2003-11-04
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Last Modified: 2010-03-19
I have a website which runs on a server within our office network.
In the office I can browse that website using http://192.168.0.1, and outside the office I have to use http://external-ip. The ADSL-modem/router routes all port-traffic to the right machine 192.168.0.1.
From within the network the external ip-address is unreachable.

Recently I have registered a domain-name for that external ip-address.
Currenly I have a solution with two hosts files and at startup I switch to the right hosts file depending on my location.
The question is: how can I configure my network so that I can use the domain name internally without changing my hosts file all the time?
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Question by:jvv
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Accepted Solution

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Pete Long earned 1000 total points
ID: 9677744
Create a Pointer Record PTR in your internal DNS namespace that resolves to the IP address you require

To open the DNS server configuration tool:
See http://techrepublic.com.com/5100-6268_11-1033115-2.html

Select DNS from the Administrative Tools folder to open the DNS console.
Highlight your computer name and choose Action | Configure The Server to launch the Configure DNS Server Wizard.
Click Next and choose the appropriate Root Server.
Click Next and then click Yes to create a forward lookup zone.
Select the appropriate radio button to install the desired Zone Type.
Click Next and type the name of the zone you are creating.
Click Next and then click Yes to create a reverse lookup zone.
Repeat Step 5.
Click Next and enter the information to identify the reverse lookup zone.
Click Next and review your selections.
Click Finish.

Managing DNS records
see http://techrepublic.com.com/5100-6268_11-1033115-3.html

You have now installed and configured your first DNS server, and you’re ready to add records to the zone(s) you created. There are various types of DNS records available. Many of them you will never use. We’ll be looking at these commonly used DNS records:

Start of Authority (SOA)
Name Servers
Host (A)
Pointer (PTR)
Canonical Name (CNAME) or Alias
Mail Exchange (MX)

***Start of Authority (SOA) record***
The Start of Authority (SOA) resource record is always first in any standard zone. The Start Of Authority (SOA) tab allows you to make any adjustments necessary. You can change the primary server that holds the SOA record, and you can change the person responsible for managing the SOA. Finally, one of the most important features of Windows 2000 is that you can change your DNS server configuration without deleting your zones and having to re-create the wheel

***Name Servers***
Name Servers specify all name servers for a particular domain. You set up all primary and secondary name servers through this record.

To create a Name Server, follow these steps:

Select DNS from the Administrative Tools folder to open the DNS console.
Expand the Forward Lookup Zone.
Right-click on the appropriate domain and choose Properties.
Select the Name Servers tab and click Add.
Enter the appropriate FQDN Server name and IP address of the DNS server you want to add.


Managing DNS records
You have now installed and configured your first DNS server, and you’re ready to add records to the zone(s) you created. There are various types of DNS records available. Many of them you will never use. We’ll be looking at these commonly used DNS records:

Start of Authority (SOA)
Name Servers
Host (A)
Pointer (PTR)
Canonical Name (CNAME) or Alias
Mail Exchange (MX)

***Start of Authority (SOA) record***
The Start of Authority (SOA) resource record is always first in any standard zone. The Start Of Authority (SOA) tab allows you to make any adjustments necessary. You can change the primary server that holds the SOA record, and you can change the person responsible for managing the SOA. Finally, one of the most important features of Windows 2000 is that you can change your DNS server configuration without deleting your zones and having to re-create the wheel


***Name Servers***
Name Servers specify all name servers for a particular domain. You set up all primary and secondary name servers through this record.

To create a Name Server, follow these steps:

Select DNS from the Administrative Tools folder to open the DNS console.
Expand the Forward Lookup Zone.
Right-click on the appropriate domain and choose Properties.
Select the Name Servers tab and click Add.
Enter the appropriate FQDN Server name and IP address of the DNS server you want to add.


***Host (A) records***
A Host (A) record maps a host name to an IP address. These records help you easily identify another server in a forward lookup zone. Host records improve query performance in multiple-zone environments, and you can also create a Pointer (PTR) record at the same time. A PTR record resolves an IP address to a host name.

To create a Host record:

Select DNS from the Administrative Tools folder to open the DNS console.
Expand the Forward Lookup Zone and click on the folder representing your domain.
From the Action menu, select New Host.
Enter the Name and IP Address of the host you are creating.
Select the Create Associated Pointer (PTR) Record check box if you want to create the PTR record at the same time. Otherwise, you can create it later.
Click the Add Host button.
 
***Pointer (PTR) records***
A Pointer (PTR) record creates the appropriate entry in the reverse lookup zone for reverse queries. As you saw in Figure H, you have the option of creating a PTR record when creating a Host record. If you did not choose to create your PTR record at that time, you can do it at any point.

To create a PTR record:

Select DNS from the Administrative Tools folder to open the DNS console.
Choose the reverse lookup zone where you want your PTR record created.
From the Action menu, select New Pointer.
Enter the Host IP Number and Host Name.
Click OK.

***Canonical Name (CNAME) or Alias records***
A Canonical Name (CNAME) or Alias record allows a DNS server to have multiple names for a single host. For example, an Alias record can have several records that point to a single sever in your environment. This is a common approach if you have both your Web server and your mail server running on the same machine.

To create a DNS Alias:

Select DNS from the Administrative Tools folder to open the DNS console.
Expand the Forward Lookup Zone and highlight the folder representing your domain.
From the Action menu, select New Alias.
Enter your Alias Name.
Enter the fully qualified domain name (FQDN).
Click OK.
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Expert Comment

by:ShineOn
ID: 9679076
All of which should work for you, if you have a Win2K server in your environment.

If you are using anything else, like Linux or NetWare or whatever, you should do the same thing, except you need to do it within the framework of the DNS service provided on the server platform.  On Linux or Netware it would probably be the name daemon (named.)

If you don't know how to configure it, RTM.
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Expert Comment

by:Pete Long
ID: 9680897
ShineOn

not like you to put Novell second??  ;0)

Or are you praying for version 7.0 (the linux kernel version)

Pete :^)
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LVL 35

Expert Comment

by:ShineOn
ID: 9681001
Pete -

Novell announced today that they are acquiring SUSE.  Linux IS Novell...

I mentioned Linux and NetWare, not Linux and Novell. ;)
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Expert Comment

by:Pete Long
ID: 9681387
>>Novell announced today

Saw that coming, I was at the Leeds Roadmap for Netware the other month :0)

Pete
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Author Comment

by:jvv
ID: 9686481
Great!
With the help of that website I succesfully configured my DNS server.
Thanks a lot.
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LVL 57

Expert Comment

by:Pete Long
ID: 9686492
Good News, glad I could help you out

and thank you!

Pete
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