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Problems after install with RH 9 - hangs at either GRUB or LILO

Posted on 2003-11-04
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
hi
after installing rh9, the problem occurs when I try to boot, either from hard disk or boot disk
the boot disk will fail
the harddisk just hangs
  - with GRUB, it just gets as far as writing GRUB out to the screen, and that is it
  - with LILO it types out LI

I noticed that Jezuit on 13 oct was having similar problems (aided by paullamhkg and others)
was this resolved? does anyone know the problem here?

I am a relative newbie to installs.

Ted
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Question by:tedbarker
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paullamhkg earned 200 total points
ID: 9683824
I think your boot manager failed, try to recover your boot manager to see it can help or not

Recover lilo
Boot with your RedHat cdrom

      linux rescue                   # At the boot
      mknod /dev/hda
      mkdir /lala
      mount /dev/hda1 /lala
      chroot /lala
      /sbin/lilo -v
      sync
      'ctrl'-'alt'-'delete'             # REBOOT

For grub try below

Following are the steps to get dual-boot working with GRUB; I figured out how to do this by looking at a similar procedure for LILO. I've verified that this works for Windows 2000 and Windows XP, and this should work on Windows NT (all 3 OSs use the same booting architecture).

Install GRUB on the first sector of the /boot partition. DO NOT INSTALL IT ON THE MBR!.
If you are performing the Red Hat installation, for the "Boot Loader Installation" screen:
Select "Use GRUB as the boot loader"
Select Install Boot Loader record on "...First sector of boot partition".
After finishing the Red Hat installation, reboot into Linux. If you don't have a boot disk, try booting in linux rescue mode
If you already have Linux installed:
Run the following command (e.g. assuming /boot is /dev/hda2): grub-install /dev/hda2.
If you don't know which partition contains /boot, run the df command and check the output.
Edit /etc/grub.conf and make sure there is an entry for your version of Windows. For reference, here is a copy of my /etc/grub.conf file.
Determine which partition contains the /boot partition by running the df command. You'll see output like this:
Filesystem           1k-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/hda3              8665372   1639580   6585612  20% /
/dev/hda2                46636      5959     38269  14% /boot
/dev/hda6               513776    189504    324272  37% /osshare
none                    256624         0    256624   0% /dev/shm
From this output, we see that /boot is on /dev/hda2.
Make a copy of the Linux boot sector onto a floppy or onto a FAT32 partition. We'll name this copy linux.bin.
To make a copy onto a floppy:
Mount the floppy drive if it's not mounted (assumes /mnt/floppy exists): mount -t msdos /dev/fd0 /mnt/floppy
Run the following command: dd if=/dev/hda2 of=/mnt/floppy/linux.bin bs=512 count=1
Substitute the path for the if= parameter (the input file) with the appropriate partition from the previous step. E.g., set if= to /dev/hda2.
To make a copy onto a FAT32 (vfat) partition:
Mount the FAT32 partition if it's not mounted yet. If it isn't listed in the df output, it hasn't been mounted yet. Check out steps 3a-3c for mounting a FAT32 partition on the "Share Partitions HOWTO".
Run the following command: dd if=/dev/hda2 of=/osshare/linux.bin bs=512 count=1
Substitute the path for the if= parameter (the input file) with the appropriate partition from the previous step. E.g., set if= to /dev/hda2. Substitute the path for the of= parameter (the output file) with whatever is appropriate for your system. The example here (of=/osshare/linux.bin) is for copying onto a FAT32 partition called osshare.
Reboot into Windows
Copy the linux.bin file to C:\
Run notepad and edit C:\boot.ini. Note that C:\boot.ini is a hidden system file, so it probably won't show up in Windows Explorer. To edit the file, try: Start->Run and enter: notepad C:\boot.ini. Add the following line at the end: c:\linux.bin="Linux"
If your C: filesystem is NTFS (not FAT32), you must edit C:\boot.ini as a user with administrator-level privileges.
To make C:\boot.ini writable, you can either :
Use Explorer:
Go to Tools->Folder Options->View and select Show hidden files and folders and deselect Hide protected operating system files (Recommended).
Right-click on the file, view the Properties and uncheck Read-only. You can now edit the file.
After editing the file, restore the settings to their original state.
Use the command-line:
Make the file writable: attrib -R -S -H C:\boot.ini.
After you've finished editing the file, put the settings back: attrib +R +S +H C:\boot.ini
For reference, here is a copy of my boot.ini file.
Reboot again. You should be able to pick either Windows or Linux. Selecting Linux will start GRUB

hope this can help :)
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by:mburdick
ID: 9736295
What you are describing was a common problem in older hardware that didn't properly support LBA mode on the hard drives.

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