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Increase Timeout for a View?

Posted on 2003-11-04
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Last Modified: 2012-06-21
Access Client, SQL Server backend.

In the Access client I am linking to a view on SQL Server.

The view is taking a long time to process, and eventually times out.

The same view takes a long time to return (in SQL Server Query Analyzer) but finishes.

I am looking at 2 options:

1)  Wrap a Pass Through Query around the View and use the Pass Through Query ODBC Timeout property to help with the timeout issue.

2)  Increase the timout for the View in the Access client (Is this possible?  I didn't see a "Timeout" property for a View like I did for a Pass Through query)
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Question by:knowlton
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by:Karen Falandays
ID: 9683308
I'm guessing the "view" comes from a query of some sort in Access, and you can increase the timeout in the design view of the query properties. If you set the timeout to 0, no timeout error occurs.

You may want to see what else is happening in the query/sql behind the scenews of the view, if it continues to be slow
Karen
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by:Karen Falandays
ID: 9683309
I'm guessing the "view" comes from a query of some sort in Access, and you can increase the timeout in the design view of the query properties. If you set the timeout to 0, no timeout error occurs.

You may want to see what else is happening in the query/sql behind the scenews of the view, if it continues to be slow
Karen
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by:knowlton
ID: 9683334
"View" in this case is a special read-only recordset available in SQL Server

I see the "View" I have to link to it via ODBC or some other means.  The code behind the View resides on SQL Server.
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by:Karen Falandays
ID: 9683353
Sorry to be so dense, but with Access as the client, how are you accessing the view? Is it listed with the table objects?
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by:knowlton
ID: 9683368
Correct.

The ICON for the link to the SQL Server View looks different....it is a globe icon.

When I go into the Design View for the SQL Server View object, and righ-click on the Title Bar and go to Properties....there seems to be no "ODBC Timeout" property (like you would see for a SQL Server Pass Through Query object)
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Karen Falandays earned 500 total points
ID: 9683383
OK, that's good. It's a linked table to Access
Now try this:
Create a query based on the view, add all of the fields and change the properties to see the odbc timeout to 0. Will that work?
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by:knowlton
ID: 9683428
RE:  setting the timeout to 0...yes I will try that in a minute.

As an example:

SELECT Count(homebuyerThanksView.EntryID) AS HBCount FROM homebuyerThanksView;

Gives a timeout error in Access.

If I run the SAME thing in SQL Server's Query Analyzer, it will finish, but takes a long time.

Hope this helps,

Tom
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by:Karen Falandays
ID: 9683461
Oh I see what you are doing. I have to think about that some more.

On another note, are you friendly with the dba who owns/maintains the data? Sounds like they need to add an index here or there to help speed things up. THat almost always does the trick.
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by:knowlton
ID: 9683469
The DBA has admitted that the problem is on his end.

As a temporary work-around I am trying to increase the timeout duration so the program can still FUNCTION, albeit very very slowly.
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by:Karen Falandays
ID: 9683503
OK, good luck with that. In the meanwhile, in the main screen of Access, try to go to Tools, Options, Advanced and manipulate some of these settings..it may help!
Karen

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by:knowlton
ID: 9683514
Thanks, Karen.

Tom
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by:Karen Falandays
ID: 9683524
Anytime, and let me know if any of the other things worked!
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by:knowlton
ID: 9683548
As a matter of fact, setting the ODBC Timeout to 0 worked for the 3 queries I'm using for counting the number of records.

Looks like you'll be getting partial if not full credit for this question.

I need a few more minutes to test....and then I'll be back here to award your points!

:)

Thanks,

Tom
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by:Karen Falandays
ID: 9683572
Oh very cool. I know how frustrating that can be! Hope the dba can get those indexes for you too, that will REALLY speed them up! I had views accessing 6 million records, in a multiuser that was dragging until he re-indexed correctly!
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by:knowlton
ID: 9683889
Your advice allowed me to workaround the problem.

The points are yours, with my sincere gratitude!

Tom
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by:Karen Falandays
ID: 9683908
Wowee! I'm so glad for you, and I love the points!
Karen
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