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ATA 33/100 Compatibility for Laptop HDD

Posted on 2003-11-05
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Last Modified: 2011-04-14
I have an old (3 yo) laptop with an old HDD. The HDD is broken, so I want it to be changed. Unfortunately, my old HDD transfer rate is Ultra-DMA 33. Someone told me that if I buy a new HDD, it will be an Ultra-DMA 100 and will not be recognized by the BIOS.

1) Is that true ?
2) If yes, is there any possibilities to upgrade the bios to make it compatible ?

please remember that it is a LAPTOP HDD, and so the compatibility problem may just occur with laptops.

thanx for any help provided
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Question by:urticaire
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philby11 earned 1000 total points
ID: 9685689
no this not true
Ultra-DMA 33 pc will work just fine with a Ultra-DMA 100 HDD.
It just means that the speed & functionality of the drive will be Ultra-DMA 33.
as for the other issue we need some more info like who made the motherboard & model #
For more detailed descriptions see this
http://www.storagereview.com/guide2000/ref/hdd/if/ide/unstdSense.html
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by:chicagoan
ID: 9685988



ATA speed is a function of the chipset, a BIOS upgrade won't get you UDMA100.
Some HD manufacturers provide a utility to set the drive to UDMA33 to avoid the operating system from recording interface errors and speed up booting, ( see also http://www.hgst.com/hdd/support/download.htm#FeatureTool for IBM/HITACHI's tool to do this) but in general you ought not to have a problem and will still see some performance gains from the higher rotational speeds amd density of modern drives.
 
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by:LucF
ID: 9686044
It's not true, but you might get some problems with the size of current harddrives, your bios might not recognize big drives, there are several limits: 2Gb, 8.2Gb, 32Gb and 127Gb (as far as I know) You'll have to check your manual if bigger drives are supported. Maybe you'll need a bios update to support larger drives.

LucF
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