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Linux partitioning...

Posted on 2003-11-05
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Last Modified: 2010-05-18
Hi all..
    I'm totally new to Linux. I'm trying to install RH 8.0 in a IDM eserver machine. The machine has 3 35GB hot swappable drivers.
I want to combine the 2nd and 3rd drive into one logical drive and load MySQL in it.
In the first drive i want to load Linux.
Is it possible to load like that ??
Also how do i partition thses drives. How much space should is give to each mount points.
Can i do something like this..
/boot  --   500MB
/  --   500MB
/usr  --  2GB
/usr/local  -- 2gb
/home  --  2gb
swap  -- 2GB
/var --  1GB
/tmp  --  1gb

and make a partition to load MySQL. I mean where will MySQL files go ??

Thanks :)
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Question by:queryanalyzer
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6 Comments
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:svenkarlsen
ID: 9688408
I'm not 100% sure with RH 8.0, - mine go in /var/lib/mysql

But that doesnt matter all that much, because you can just do a default install and then map the drive to the relevant directory when you've located it.

Cocerning your partition scheme: you can do pretty much as you like, as long as there is room enough for the system (which you have in your scheme).

Only suggestion might be re. your /home, - this will hold all users work-files, so 2Gb may be a bit small (you've got lots of space, as I see it. Otherwise I find that RedHat will make some quite reasonable partitioning suggestions when selecting to install as server.

As for spanning several disks, I believe you're in luck: as far as I know, RH 8 was the first RH to include the LVM, (logical volume manager), so that should not be a problem, - just remeber to install it and add you space where you need it.

You can read about LVM here:

http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-lvm/

Kind regards,
Sven
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LVL 40

Assisted Solution

by:jlevie
jlevie earned 90 total points
ID: 9688881
Given your disks I'd partition the system disk like:

/boot     100Mb
/         10000Mb
/var      1000Mb
/home  remainder

By not using separate /usr, /usr/local, & /tmp I maximize the usability of the free space by having all in one spot.

Then I'd either set up a software RAID 0 (concatentated disks) or LVM across the other two disks, yielding about 70Gb for database use. Ordinarily RH 8.0's MySQL installation will place the database in /var/lib/mysql, but that can be changed by editing /etc/init.d/mysqld.

Given that 8.0 is "end of life" in December, I'd suggest that you go with RedHat 9 or consider Enterprise Linux 3.0 ES.
0
 

Author Comment

by:queryanalyzer
ID: 9689078
Hi 'jlevie'...
   If MySQL gets installed in /var/lib/mysql and the /var size is set to 1000Mb wont this be too same for a database. This is asuming the database data gets stored somewhere with in the /var/lib/mysql directory ??
I want like 30Gb for the database.

Thanks.
0
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Author Comment

by:queryanalyzer
ID: 9689234
Also..  this machine is going to run as a server, so there arent going to be many users, root and one more may be.

Thanks.
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LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:jlevie
ID: 9689343
The default location of the database is defined by datadir="/var/lib/mysql" in /etc/init.d/mysqld. The first time that service is started the database area (cluster in SQL speak) is initialized. If you were to mount your LVM/RAID volume as /dbdata and change that to datadir="/dbdata" MySQL will use that area for the database store.

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LVL 9

Accepted Solution

by:
svenkarlsen earned 90 total points
ID: 9691132
queryanalyzer,

 I believe you should take a look at the LVM link I posted ( http://www-106.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-lvm/ ).

In short: if you are just used to the fixed and static function of disk partitioning that you get from e.g. Windows and earlier Linux, then you will learn that LVM will make a great difference: you can DYNAMICALLY resize your partitions (or at least add space to an overfilled partition) without rebooting and all the tedious stuff.

The only partitions you should be concerned about are the basic: /boot, /, /var, - etc. If you accept the RH default for those and only install on the first disk, then you will be able to use the two other disks as a pool of free space to add anywhere it is required, - be it for databases, /usr or whatever.
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