• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 187
  • Last Modified:

Group policy question

We are trying to implement a group policy that allows authenticated users the ability to write to their local computers hard-disks, i.e. the ability for a user to be authenticated to the domain, launch a program on the pc, and allow that  program to write files to c:, i.e. temporary files, etc. under the authenticated users authority. I would like to limit the users power on the local computer as much as possible. What would be the simpilest way to accomplish this
0
jdickerson
Asked:
jdickerson
  • 3
1 Solution
 
Netman66Commented:
By default Domain Users become part of the local Users Group on the workstation.  This Users Group has little authority to do anything system-related.  They can, however, write to the C:\ drive as you require.

You should not have to do anything special to allow this.  Unless....your apps are not Windows 2000 compliant.  In this case, import the COMPATWS.INF security template into a Group Policy that is connected to an OU where your computers exist (note - this cannot be the default Computers Container as you cannot apply group policy to that built-in system folder).

Hope that helps.
0
 
jdickersonAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the tip Netman. I did forget to mention the fact that the primary program I'm asking about is "non-Windows 2000 compliant". We tricked it to run on W2K by manually copying some .dlls and tweeking the programs .ini file. We are setting up a new domain from scratch(migrating off of Novell for file/print) and haven't had to deal with these types of issues before. I am going to try your suggestion and will get back with my progress.
0
 
jdickersonAuthor Commented:
Interesting problem we are having. Our policies are not running on our workstations, although I can see the policy changes take affect on our servers...stuff like removing Documents from the Start menu, setting wallpapers, all the changes show on the servers, but not on the pcs. We downloaded a utility called gpresult from M$oft and ran it. The results show that our workstation computers are members of the built-in administrators, everyone, and NT authenticated users groups. This doesn't seem right to me and I am thinking this is causing the policies not to be applied to our workstations. Any ideas to what we have done wrong??
0
 
jdickersonAuthor Commented:
Got it working now.....just a hint to anyone reading this post, If you use AD and want to use Group policies, your clients have to point their primary DNS to you AD servers. We had our workstations configured to use our ISP DNS servers as their primary DNS source. This caused the policies not to be applied to our workstations. As soon as we changed the DNS settings, policies work like a champ. Another long day spent to learn a simple lesson.....
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Path Explorer

An intuitive utility to help find the CSS path to UI elements on a webpage. These paths are used frequently in a variety of front-end development and QA automation tasks.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

  • 3
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now