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+ operator commutativity

Posted on 2003-11-05
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Last Modified: 2010-04-01
I'm writing a string class as a personal exercise. I overloaded the plus operator for char* so that I can do:

String s = "test";
s = s + "ing";

However, it is still invalid to do:

String s = "ing";
s = "test" + s;

How can I improve my implementation to support this? (I notice that the C++ standard library string class allows you to do this)

Thanks!
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Question by:daniel_bigham
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5 Comments
 
LVL 86

Accepted Solution

by:
jkr earned 450 total points
ID: 9690343
Use a global operator

String& operator+ ( const char* r, const String& l) {

  //...
}

and make it a 'friend' of your 'String' class if you need access to non-public members.
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LVL 19

Assisted Solution

by:Dexstar
Dexstar earned 300 total points
ID: 9690393
jkr:

> String& operator+ ( const char* r, const String& l) {

>   //...
> }

How could you implement that function without returning a reference to a local variable (a big no-no)?  Should it not be:
     String operator+( const char* r, const String& l ) { /* ... */ }
?

Which obviates the need for a good string class to implement reference counting.  :)

Also, if you want to be able to:
     String s2 = s1 + "blah";

Then you'll also need to define:
     String operator+( const String& r, const char* l ) { /* ... */ }

And probably:
     String operator+( const char* r, const char* l ) { /* ... */ }

Hope that helps,
Dex*
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LVL 86

Expert Comment

by:jkr
ID: 9690406
>>Should it not be:
>>    String operator+( const char* r, const String& l ) { /* ... */ }

Yup, you are right - too many non-global operators today, I guess, so it's probably a typing habit :o)
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LVL 1

Author Comment

by:daniel_bigham
ID: 9690890
Thanks guys!
0
 

Expert Comment

by:vijay_kr_m
ID: 9692529
Hi  ,
I assume  you are using STL.
Now for your wrapper class String you have to user STL string class.
Overloading of the binary operatory "+" your implementation should be having the following

   String operator=(String  &,const char&);
   String operator=(String  &,const char*);
   String operator=(String &,String  &);
   
   String operator+=(String&,const char*);
   String operator+=(String&,const char&);
   String operator+=(String&,String&);

   String operator+(String &,const char*);
   String operator+(String &,const char&);
   String operator+(String &,String &);
You have now the freedom of either writing a friend function/Member function for implementation. Then bet u will never have any cribbings from Compiler
..regards-vijay
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