Currency Symbol

I am using JDK1.4. When run the following code
> Locale sg = new Locale("en", "SG");
> System.out.println(sg.getLanguage() + "   " + sg.getCountry() + "   " + NumberFormat.getCurrencyInstance(sg).format(1000000));
I get
> en   SG   SGD1,000,000.00

Actually what I wanted is S$1,000,000.00
Is it possible to configure it to use S$ instead of SGD. I understand that currency code is used when the symbol is not available. Is there a way to plugin the setting I want to specific locale?
RayLeongAsked:
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jimmackCommented:
I haven't used it personally, so I'm just suggesting this ;-)

java.util.Currency may be what you want.

It has two methods to retrieve the currency symbols.
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savalouCommented:
If you do NumberFormat.getAvailableLocales you get an array of locales supported by NumberFormat.  In my implementation of J2SDK1.4 I have 134 locales available and Singapore (SG) isn't one of them.  So first of all NumberFormat doesn't do anything special for your country case.  So you might as well get your currency symbol from Currency.

However, the currency information comes out of locale data and the Currency class is more or less a convenience class for this.  When it doesn't find a currency symbol, it just returns the currency code.  For Singapore, it doesn't find a currency symbol.   You can't override this in code.

You could lobby Sun that Singapore is an important economic zone and it's currency should be given better treatment.  In the meantime, you could create a new DecimalFormatSymbol, set its currency code, use a Decimal format to format your number.
        Locale sg = new Locale("en", "SG");
        DecimalFormatSymbols sgsymbols = new DecimalFormatSymbols(sg);
        sgsymbols.setCurrencySymbol("S$");
        DecimalFormat f = new DecimalFormat("\u00A4###,###.00", sgsymbols);
        System.out.println(f.format(1000000));

But in the end do you gain any generality?  Might as well slap a "S$" in there?
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jimmackCommented:
Well I tried out the Currency class, with quite disappointing results.  Most symbols were just codes.  There were a few that were correct (eg. the sterling symbol was correct for UK pounds), however the US Dollar symbol was not shown.  I just got USD.

Here is the code I used.  It might be worth trying on your system to see what you get (I had 134 locales, just like savalou).

Other than that I'd go along with savlou's "Campaign for the recognition of the Singapore Dollar" ;-) and implement his suggestion.

If you do run the following code, I'd be interested to know if you got the symbol (or even the locale).

import java.util.*;

public class CurrencyLocales
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Locale[] locales = Locale.getAvailableLocales();
        System.out.println("Available locales = " + locales.length);
       
        for (int i = 0; i < locales.length; i++)
        {
            System.out.print("Locale = " + locales[i].toString());
            try
            {
                Currency currency = Currency.getInstance(locales[i]);
                System.out.println(" Currency = " + currency.getSymbol());
            }
            catch (IllegalArgumentException iae)
            {
                System.out.println(" Currency = Invalid locale");
            }
        }
    }
}
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RayLeongAuthor Commented:
Other than programming, is there any way to plugin a class, property file to overwrite the default currency symbol used for a particular locale. Is the Currency or Locale design to take in other class, property file created by developers.
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jimmackCommented:
I've quickly searched around a few times today, but I can't find an easy way to do this.  I think savalou has provided the best answer for this problem.

Sorry.

Jim.
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jimmackCommented:
It's never nice to receive a grade C, so savalou, I sympathise.  However, RayLeong, this is the first time I have actually seen a grade C given appropriately.  Thank you for reading (and understanding ;-)) the grading guidelines ;-)
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RayLeongAuthor Commented:
Savalou had gave a sugguestion which is quite valid. The problem lies in my question. I don't think my question has an answer, so I really should not mislead the public into thinking that this question is closed with a proper solution. Savalou, no offends for the C grade though.
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