cyrillic alphabet

a friend sends me messages that he receives in Russian. He transmits these messages to me. I receive illegible material. My friend tells me there is a way for me to encode these messages. Whatever I do does not work out. maniousha
maniouchaAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
Computer101Commented:
PAQed, with points refunded (150)

Computer101
E-E Admin
0
 
patrickabCommented:
This link may help you with cyrillic alphabets:

http://www.cyrillic.com/ref/cyrillic/fontlist.html

0
 
maniouchaAuthor Commented:
thank you. What I need now is just to be able to receive the message in cyrillic and not in strange illegible language. maniousha
0
Cloud Class® Course: Amazon Web Services - Basic

Are you thinking about creating an Amazon Web Services account for your business? Not sure where to start? In this course you’ll get an overview of the history of AWS and take a tour of their user interface.

 
CRAKCommented:
Did you install Windows' multilanguage support for Cyrillic?
In 98: Control panel > Add/remove programs > Windows setup > Multi language support > Cyrillic.
0
 
maniouchaAuthor Commented:
To:CRAK.I did everything. have a floppy disk and the result is the same. I return to my Email. thanks. maniousha  
0
 
CRAKCommented:
If that's ok and codepage 1251 (patrickab's link) is available, then I don't understand.

Just wondering.... what if some odd mail router does not support those characters?
Can you check with your friend what happens if he/she sends the message in a zipped (word?) file? Those files are send "binary"; not "ascii". It just might make a difference!

And another question: what mail program are you using? Notes, cc-mail or different?
0
 
maniouchaAuthor Commented:
sorry, I am a beginner and a little old lady and do not know what codepage 1251 is.
For the time being I will try not to bother the "friend". He thinks that those messages are extra work for him and then we speak Russian and I am not sure of how his English is.
I am using copper net. does that answer the question? Thank you very much. maniousha
0
 
CRAKCommented:
A bit technical perhaps, but discard this info as you please...
In computers all characters have a number. Usually, or originally, there were 256 numbers available (based on 1 byte = 8 bits with possible 2 values (0 or 1) there are 2^8 different combinations of 0's and 1's = 256). Suitable to store "our" character set, but incapable of handling lots of other languages. First they invented "double byte character sets" with 2^16 = over 65.000 options, but that still wasn't quite suitable to handle the different.... character sets (haven't got a better word to explain).
Imaging.... Cyrillic, Greek, Japanese, Chinese, Thai, Arabic. That's where codepages came in hand. Each "set" has its own codepage to accomodate a separate list of characters. Chinese character no 'n' will look different than the cyrillic one. The same number might be unused in "our" codepage. That's probably what you are seeing.... a russian (?) text shown in a non-russian characterset.

Unless it was a message that was "UUencoded".... I have a few of those as well but never worked out how to unencode it. Does your message mention someding about "UUencoding"? If so.... let's join forces and find out!  ;-))
0
 
maniouchaAuthor Commented:
Unicode was the secret.  and I thank you very much. I do not know whether it had something to do with the fact that I did something in order to get cyrillic letters. I think I can type now. So far, though I was able to read what was already printed in Russian but not what was sent to me. again thanks. maniousha
0
 
CRAKCommented:
?!?!?... I didn't use that term!  ;-)
Congrats! Glad it's working!
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.