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Formatting harddrive.. impossible?

Posted on 2003-11-08
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Last Modified: 2013-12-06
My computer is an old AST Bravo MS-5166. Today I did something stupid. I went crazy with Fdisk and ruined my memory, and now Red Hat 6.2 won't boot up properly. Basically it tries to boot up and then halts on the line "Kernel panic: VFS: Unable to mount root fs on 03:05". What I was trying to do was format my computer so I could reinstall Linux and start over fresh. Now I can't format at all, as I have no prompt to work with. The computer executes all of this and doesn't do anything with the boot disk when I turn the computer on with it in. My BIOS don't have any options to allow formatting. What can I possibly do to be able to use my computer again?
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Question by:Tabris42
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5 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:anupnellip
ID: 9709416
hii ,
  Do u have the RedHat installation CD . U should have as u where going to format your hard disk . So use this cd and boot your box from the CDROM . the Linux installation screen will come up and u can u can delete your old partition and install a fresh operating system . I hope u dont have any data on the disk ?? I am give u this advice because u presume that this is what u wanted to do . It would be a good Idea if u can install the latest Linux ver in order to avoid driver problems .

Regards

Anup
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Author Comment

by:Tabris42
ID: 9709918
Booting from the CD is not an option available to me.
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Accepted Solution

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svenkarlsen earned 500 total points
ID: 9710305
Hi Tabris42,

In your BIOS setup, look for some setting that control the boot-up sequence, - probably it has been set to something like: "C:;A:". Change that to "A:;C:).


Kind regards,
Sven
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Author Comment

by:Tabris42
ID: 9710389
Close, my BIOS options have a selection for "Boot Device: Try Floppy First" (as opposed to "Try Hard Drive First"), and still it is doing nothing. Is it even possible to create a Linux boot disk in Windows?
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Expert Comment

by:svenkarlsen
ID: 9710571
Yes, - if you have a windows machine, insert the CD-ROM and open a DOS-box:

C:\> d:
D:\> cd \dosutils
D:\dosutils> rawrite
Enter disk image source file name: ..\images\boot.img
Enter target diskette drive: a:
Please insert a formatted diskette into drive A: and
press --ENTER-- : [Enter]
D:\dosutils>

(Assuming your CD-drive is d:)

Look at:
http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/RHL-7.1-Manual/install-guide/s1-steps-install-cdrom.html#S2-STEPS-MAKE-DISKS


for further info
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