Solved

Backspace at login prompt

Posted on 2003-11-10
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Last Modified: 2013-12-27
I would like Backspace to be ^H, as this is what Telnet and our terminal emulator sends (correctly).  At the login prompt, however, Backspace is interpreted as ^? (Delete) whereas once logged in it is then ^H.  We don't even set using stty erase in .profile or .login.  How can I change the terminal behaviour AT the login prompt i.e. prior to logging in without having to reconfigure Telnet etc.
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Question by:CuthbertDibbleGrub
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14 Comments
 
LVL 18

Expert Comment

by:liddler
ID: 9714368
I "think" you can only do this in your telnet client
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Author Comment

by:CuthbertDibbleGrub
ID: 9714709
Our Unixware servers never did this - behaved impecably, even with same terminal emulator settings and with Telnet - only happens on Solaris - surely the 'pre-login' terminal behaviour must be configurable on the Solaris box somewhere - I'd rather leave Backspace as ^H as that works absolutely everywhere else!
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LVL 18

Expert Comment

by:liddler
ID: 9714854
Might be in the ttya-mode settings in the OBP, but I "think" this is only for the serial console port.
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LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:yuzh
ID: 9719222
In command line:

stty erase "^H"

You can put it in your .profile.


IF you do telnet from a windows PC, set the TERM=ansi, if you use secure shell client login from PC,
TERM=vt100
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Author Comment

by:CuthbertDibbleGrub
ID: 9720532
yuzh,

It's too late at that stage.  I'm after the default terminal settings before you actually log in.  As I've said, after login, all is well.  Essentially, I need to know what stty settings are used by the login process itself.  If I change everybody's .profile to interpret erase as ^? and then reconfigure the terminal emulator as well then this would cure it, but that words 'sledgehammer' and 'nut' spring to mind.  I'd rather force the Solaris box to use ^H in all instanxes, and that includes a
0
 

Author Comment

by:CuthbertDibbleGrub
ID: 9720533
yuzh,

It's too late at that stage.  I'm after the default terminal settings before you actually log in.  As I've said, after login, all is well.  Essentially, I need to know what stty settings are used by the login process itself.  If I change everybody's .profile to interpret erase as ^? and then reconfigure the terminal emulator as well then this would cure it, but that words 'sledgehammer' and 'nut' spring to mind.  I'd rather force the Solaris box to use ^H in all instanxes, and that includes a
0
 

Author Comment

by:CuthbertDibbleGrub
ID: 9720534
yuzh,

It's too late at that stage.  I'm after the default terminal settings before you actually log in.  As I've said, after login, all is well.  Essentially, I need to know what stty settings are used by the login process itself.  If I change everybody's .profile to interpret erase as ^? and then reconfigure the terminal emulator as well then this would cure it, but that words 'sledgehammer' and 'nut' spring to mind.  I'd rather force the Solaris box to use ^H in all instanxes, and that includes a
0
 

Author Comment

by:CuthbertDibbleGrub
ID: 9720542
What happened there!  To conclude:

"...and that includes at the login prompt."
0
 
LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:yuzh
ID: 9720606
If you don't want to change all the users .profile, you can put :

stty erase "^H"

in the globe login script /etc/profile

In this case, change one file apply to the whole side.
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:CadburyKat
ID: 10169546
The client needs to be aware of the settings that you are after.

The server is not configurable until .profile type config is read.

Work on the Client Side.
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Accepted Solution

by:
CuthbertDibbleGrub earned 0 total points
ID: 10172067
God Bless Usenet! Here's the answer...

You may modify the /kernel/drv/options.conf file and replace "7f" with"8".

For example, modify -

ttymodes="2502:1805:bd:8a3b:3:1c:7f:15:4:0:0:0:11:13:1a:19:12:f:17:16";

to

ttymodes="2502:1805:bd:8a3b:3:1c:8:15:4:0:0:0:11:13:1a:19:12:f:17:16";

Reboot

This effectively maps ^H as backspace on the server so it works even pre-login.  Everyone's happy with this solution as it's more standardised and we can configure the few tools that don't use ^H individually.
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LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:yuzh
ID: 10172310
Hi CuthbertDibbleGrub,

    Glad to hear you  found a good answered, do you want to refund the points, and PAQ this question?

    yuzh

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Author Comment

by:CuthbertDibbleGrub
ID: 10172356
Yes please (how do I do that?)
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