• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 4011
  • Last Modified:

"find -mtime" differences AIX4 and AIX5

Hi!

The definition of "find -mtime" changed!

find all files changed between 24-48 hours
AIX4: find . -mtime 2
AIX5: find . -mtime 1

find all files changed between 48-72 hours
AIX4: find . -mtime 3
AIX5: find . -mtime 2

find all files changed between 0-24 hours
AIX4: find . -mtime 1
AIX5: find . -mtime 0

find all files changed between 0-48 hours
AIX4: find . -mtime -2
AIX5: ???
AIX5: find . -mtime -1 -> returns all files changes between 24-48
AIX5: find . -mtime -2 -> returns all files changes between 24-72

BUT HOW TO find all files between 0 and 48/72/... hours???

thx
michi
0
witty
Asked:
witty
  • 3
1 Solution
 
yuzhCommented:
Here's what you can do, create a stamp file first, than use find.
eg, to find all the files 0-72 hrs, you do: (I use ksh/bash/sh shell systax)

STAMP=`TZ=$TZ+72 date  +%Y%m%d%H%M`
touch -t $STAMP mystamp

find . -newer mystamp -print
0
 
yuzhCommented:
how's it going, need more help?
0
 
wittyAuthor Commented:
@yuzh:

thanks for your comment:
... but creating a temporary file is no solution :-(
any other idea?

thx
michi
0
 
yuzhCommented:
Well, I have not used an AIX box for a while now, and don't have AIX 5.x on hand
for testing:

In normal condition:

find . -mtime -n
should return all the files modified in 0 - n*24 hours (this working fine in Solaris,
HP-UX, FreeBDS, Linux, SCO ....!)

If "find" behave the way as you mentioned above,  you better use a tmp file.
(it cost you nothing 0 byte, if you use it in a script, you can clean it up
after "find"),  otherwise, you have to use "for/while" loop, to do multiple "find"!
0

Featured Post

Industry Leaders: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

  • 3
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now