Problems Porting Code

Hey everyone -

I wrote some source code on a Linux box (Red Hat), and I am trying to compile it on a different Linux Box using gcc.  Unfortunately, I am getting the error that there is a parse error on line 24.  (I marked line 24 in the code below).  Anyone know why this could be?  The Linux OS should be the same on both machines, the only difference is that one is an SMP, and the other is a laptop.  Thanks for any help you can give me.  

CODE SNIPPET -------------------------------------------------------
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>


int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
      int n;

      if (argc < 2)
      {
            printf("Usage: %s <Times to Run>i\n", argv[0]);
            exit(0);      
      }

      else
      {
            n = atoi(argv[1]);
      }

      // initialize time & counter
// ERROR HERE------------->      time_t startTime = time(&startTime);      
      int counter = 0;
      
      // control program - runs ./primeGenerator n times
      while (counter < n)
      {
            pid_t PID0 = fork();
            
            if (PID0 == 0)
            {
                  // child process
                  execlp("./primeGenerator", "primeGenerator", "100000", NULL);
            }
            
            else
            {
                  counter++;
            }
      }
      wait(NULL);
      
      time_t endTime = time(&endTime);
      
      int secondsRun = difftime(endTime, startTime);
      printf("This program took %d seconds to run.\n", secondsRun);

      return 0;
}

-----------------------END CODE SNIPPET

Thanks!
~ace
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TopaceAsked:
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Kent OlsenConnect With a Mentor Data Warehouse Architect / DBACommented:

Hi Topace,

Grg99 doesn't come with English subtitles.  :)  But he does know his stuff!


Just move that line (and the next one) to the declaratives block (next to the "int n" statement).


Kent
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grg99Connect With a Mentor Commented:

That line is the first place you used a c++ - ism.   I suspect you named this source file foo.c and it was foo.cpp on the other system.
Either that or the default on this compiler is to assume it's C, and on the other one it was vice-versa.

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grg99Commented:
Subtitles, heck, I could use footnotes sometimes.

You can fix the program several ways:

rename foo.c   to foo.cpp

use the gcc compiler switch "-x c++"  to force a C++ compile.

Move all the declarations to the top of the function.

BTW your elapsed time variable  may work better if it's declared as a time_t.

 
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TopaceAuthor Commented:
I guess I didn't realize that C requires that you declare all of your variables in a specific place.  Is this true for all functions, or just the main function?

~ace
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Kent OlsenData Warehouse Architect / DBACommented:

All functions.

Actually, to C, main() is "just another function" so it must follow the same rules that apply to functions and function definitions.

Kent
0
 
TopaceAuthor Commented:
Thanks a lot -

I appreciate your guys' speedy response.  I figured it wasn't too hard of a question, but you saved me a TON of headaches.  

~ace
0
 
Kent OlsenData Warehouse Architect / DBACommented:

1 TON of headaches == 50 points

40 pounds of headaches == 1 point

Don't you wish T-Bones were that cheap?  ;)

Glad that we could help,
Kent

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