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Hosting Configuration

Posted on 2003-11-12
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Last Modified: 2012-05-04
Hi,
I just need to know if Apache servers work the same way as IIS.
For example:
On IIS you can have "Virtual Servers", where you have multiple IP address assigned to a network card.
A virtual server is like your default website and you can have other websites along side it.
You may have an IP address of 123.123.123.123 with 10 sites all assigned to that address. If you wee to ping all 10 individual hostnames they would each return the same IP. But if you were to type that  hostname into a browser, it should only display the main default virtual servers website.

Is the configuration on Unix based webservers the same as this???

Thanks
GJOK
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Question by:gjok
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5 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:PsiCop
ID: 9734566
Yes, Apache does name-based virtual hosting.

Don't confuse that with ping. Ping is an ICMP-based tool that operates much lower down the protocol stack.

Apache uses the <VirtualHost> directive in its configuration file to support virtual hosting. You didn't bother to specify which version of Apache you're working with, so this like is for v2.0. See http://httpd.apache.org/docs-2.0/mod/core.html#virtualhost

Remember that name-based virtual hosting requires the client be using HTTP 1.1 (most modern clients do).
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Expert Comment

by:PsiCop
ID: 9734594
To answer the other part of your question "I just need to know if Apache servers work the same way as IIS." the answer is NO.

Apache doesn't crash, doesn't need 150 patches out of the box, and can't be casually rooted by any script kiddie with a dial-up connection. Apache is immune to NIMDA and CodeRed. Apache takes a fraction of the resources IIS gobbles down. You take take the Apache source and customize the software for what YOU need, rather than relying on a monopoly to listen to your needs.
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Author Comment

by:gjok
ID: 9734751
Thanks,
I'm not currently using Apache but I'm looking into migrating from IIS (so version is unknown at this stage).

To summarise, is this scenario possible...?
I could have an Apache box with :
 - 10 VirtualHosts, each with its own IP address.
 - Each virtual host could have, say, 10 completly unrelated domain names (www.mydomain.com; www.yourdomain.co.uk; etc)
 - Each of these 10 completly unrelated domain names would share the same IP address.
 - The box would therefore have 100 websites, but only 10 IP addresses are assigned to that machine.

GJOK
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Accepted Solution

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PsiCop earned 125 total points
ID: 9734941
The ability of a server to have multiple IP addresses is dependent on the OS, not the webserver software.

Different instances of Apache CAN listen to different specific IP addresses.

Each instance of Apache CAN have its own list of name-based virtual hosts.

Managing such a creation could be cumbersome, but it can be done.
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Author Comment

by:gjok
ID: 9735121
Many thanks.
GJOK
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