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Router setting prevents visibility in Network Browser?

Cisco gurus,

Is there a router setting that will prevent systems from being visible
in the Windows 2000 Network Browser?

We've got a couple of server clusters that reside on different
subnets, with a couple of 3600 routers (IOS 12.0) and Catalyst 2900 XL
switches between them. From either subnet the servers on the other subnet
are not visible in Network Browser. However, connectivity is not a
problem. The clusters can interact with each other, and if you do a
system search for one of the "invisible" servers, Network Browser will
find it. From one subnet you can map to servers on the other subnet
without any difficulty.

For customer service reasons, we'd like for all the servers to be
visible in the Net Browser. We've checked system settings until we're
cross-eyed, and everything seems to be OK. We've flushed the NetBIOS
tables, ensured system visibility (net config server /hidden:no), and
done everything else we can think of, up to and including a voodoo
dance around the rack, but nothing has worked. The only other thing we
can think of is that it's a router setting.

Is there a setting that would prevent servers on one side of a 3600
from being visible to systems on the other side? If so, how do we
change it? My experience with routers is limited right now. I can
configure basic settings, but that's about it. Any help would be
greatly appreciated!
0
msenecal
Asked:
msenecal
2 Solutions
 
Scotty_ciscoCommented:
Msenecal

The problem you are having sounds like you are using WINS and the data uses brodcast of NetBios to advertise the services and this is blocked by the routers.

you can setup your LMhost file in all of your hosts or you can use a devation on the following.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk389/tk689/technologies_tech_note09186a008011b570.shtml

this link shows what you need to forward in the router and some of the commands to do it; It also has a link to microsoft for the client host solutions.

Using the following command may help as well ip forward-protocol

here is the link for this
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/iosswrel/ps1831/products_command_summary_chapter09186a0080087e90.html#xtocid1829718

this should help

Thanks
Scott
0
 
lrmooreCommented:
Hey, Scott, haven't seen you 'round these parts lately....

Scott has shown you one way, using "ip forward-protocol"
!
ip forward-protocol udp 137
ip forward-protocol udp 138
ip forward-protocol tcp 135
<etc>
!

An alternative:
On the interfaces closest to the users, add "ip helper-address <broadcast>"

Example:

RTR-A
Interface Ethernet 0/0
 ip address 192.168.4.1 255.255.255.0
 ip helper-address 192.168.3.255  <-- assuming that remote LAN = 192.168.3.0/24

RTR-B
Interface Ethernet 0/0
 ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
 ip helper-address 192.168.4.255  <-- assuming that remote LAN = 192.168.4.0/24

in addition to forwarding Bootp requestst, this one command opens up a whole range of others, to include the NetBios ports.

0

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