Page encoding render issues in different countries

Hi,

I have a web site that users can log into from China, Finland and the UK.  Recently users in China reported that some pages were displaying incorrectly (HTML showing in the page).  An example was code that originally was written

     <FORM....>

was translated by browsers in China to read

     ?FORM....>

To combat this, I added the line

   <META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=utf-8" />

to the <HEAD> area, which successfully solved the issue.

Now, users in Finland are saying they cannot log in because their usernames have become corrupt, and characters that usually have dots/accents above them are displaying as black squares.  When I view their details from my administrator account I see this problem also.

Can anyone tell me if there is a method of encoding to solve both problems?  Or is there another way that is easier than forcing all my Finnish colleagues to have their names changed??!

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RouchieAsked:
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RouchieAuthor Commented:
Also to make things more complicated, some of our users may be using IE4 and Win95, although most use IE5/6 with Win98/2000.
0
ZontarCommented:
You'll need to convert all the usernames to utf-8. What server programming technology and database are you using?
0
RouchieAuthor Commented:
It's not actually our server, but I believe its' ASP.NET running on Win2000 with SQL Server 7
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RouchieAuthor Commented:
The solution to this question turned out to be a mixture of character encoding, and the fonts that were used in the pages.  Obviously, a font was required that had support for both Simplified Chinese and Finnish characters, but the stylesheet hadn't been altered to allow for this.

Once the page was encoded as UTF-8, an appropriate font was then required.  I have asked a more detailed question regarding this in another topic group.
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RouchieAuthor Commented:
For anyone experiencing a similar problem, the issue is investigated further in this forum...

  http://www.experts-exchange.com/Web/Web_Languages/CSS/Q_20802378.html
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Computer101Commented:
PAQed, with points refunded (150)

Computer101
E-E Admin
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