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Can a bad motherboard damage hard disks?

Posted on 2003-11-12
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Last Modified: 2010-04-26
I have an ABS computer that I bought this summer.  In the base month BOTH of my hard disks (Western Digital 80 & 120 Gig Caviars) have gone bad.  A couple of the support reps indicated that they thought my probem was either that I got drives from a bad shipment of Western Digitals or that my motherboard somehow corrupted the drives.  (The ABS phone support "kids" sounded like highschoolers who were reading a manual to me.  I am not confident in the information they gave me.)

The computer has an ASUS A7N8X motherboard with an Athlon 2600 (I think it's 2600) processor.  North Bridge chipset, nVidia nForce2.

I feel like I'm on Car Talk but I'll try to describe what happened before the drives died.  The smaller (E:) drive started making rhythmic high pitched whirring and chirping sounds for a few weeks.  Then it was not recognized by the computer.  The 120 gig (C:) drive later started to make a rhythmic clunking sound when I was booting the machine.  If I hit Delete and went into the BIOS, the clunking stopped.  When I exited the BIOS, the clunking started again.  Sometimes we were able to get the bootup to complete after exiting the BIOS.  Other times it did not work.

I also have "on board" sound and, now that my computer has been rebuilt, I must say the sound is awfully muffled.  I have tried to play with the settings in the control panel but it made no difference.

I am concerned that the ABS kidlets may have been right about the motherboard and that these next two drives will be somehow corrupted also.  I've tried to search the net for an answer to this question ...  but I must not know enough to narrow the search because I come up with thousands of hits but none really speak to the issue of whether a M.B. can corrupt the HD.

Thanks for any help you can give me.

Ann
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Question by:scharpfac
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2 Comments
 
LVL 13

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by:AlbertaBeef
AlbertaBeef earned 60 total points
ID: 9736846
It's unusual for a motherboard to cause damage to hard drives.  In fact, I'm not sure I've ever heard of it.  If it is a hardware problem doing drive damage, it is more than likely the power supply.

But it sounds like the bearings in the drives went, which is not something that should have happened due to a bad component in a computer.

I find it more likely that you simply had two hard drives fail.
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LucF earned 65 total points
ID: 9737924
I agree with AB, If this is a hardware failure you should blame your PSU, not your motherboard. Or it could just be bad luck. To be sure, check the voltages of your powersupply or just replace it with a new one.

LucF
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