is 192.1.1.x a public or private ip address?

A few years ago when we setup our office network the vendor made our network address 192.1.1.x with a subnet of 255.255.255.0

At the time he said this was reserved for private networks but when i look around it looks like 192.168.x.x is what we should be using as private network addresses.

Is 192.1.1.x private and are we going to run into any problems if we continue using it?

Thanks,
Tom
saunaGAsked:
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sunray_2003Commented:
It is used as the internal router address or internal network address

Sunray
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ihuckabyCommented:
According to the official RFC, 192.168.x.x is the reserved space.   (http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/cgi-bin/rfc/rfc1918.html)

Back in the early days, 192.x.x.x was the Class C addresses handed out, and I've seen things like 192.241.x.x as public addresses.

Technically, I don't believe it's a private network.

However, that being said: it will only cause you problems if you try to connect to another 192.1.1.x network.

By the fact that you think it's private, I doubt you're propagating this network onto the internet.

Worst case scenario, there's 250 or so IP's you can't hit on the internet because your hosts think they're internal. (Or you send this out to the internet and many people can't get there, because they're coming to you, which someone should bring to your attention).
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Casca1Commented:
In order to insure your network is not routable, you should change it.
192.168.X.X is the IANA reserved for private address range in the class C network space.
However, if you have had no issues, I wouldn't truly worry about it.
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zookeepa1Commented:
...yeah it's 192.168.x.x not 192.x.x.x that's considered private
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CaltorCommented:
Wouldn't use that vendor again though ;)
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saunaGAuthor Commented:
yeah.... its a private network...
no biggie, i don't think its worth the hassle to go to 192.168.x.x
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CaltorCommented:
Probably not unless you really need to get to 192.1.1.x addresses one day. Maybe if it was your supplier's website or something. Pretty low chance though as has been stated above.
Just worth bearing in mind I guess if you add anymore subnets or if ever you are changing the addressing.
Actually now I think of it in your other question http://www.experts-exchange.com/Networking/WinNT_Networking/Q_21359119.html you are following my recommendation to create a second subnet for the second card in your server. Might be a good idea to make it 192.168.2.100 instead of 192.1.2.100 now whilst it is easy.
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