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Posted on 2003-11-13
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To C++ experts,

    If I want my print() function to be able to print things both on files and screen, is that better to declare the funtion as "void print(ostream &os)"
or "void print(ostream os)" ? or any other format ? and why ?

    thanks.

meow.
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Question by:meow00
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efn earned 80 total points
ID: 9743806
Passing the stream by reference as in

void print(ostream & os)

is preferable.  Stream objects are not designed to be passed around by value, so you should only have one stream object and pass it around by reference.

A stream object needs to maintain state, and the state changes when you output to the stream.  It may be buffering the output or maintaining a file position.  If you pass the stream by value, the print function will change the state of a temporary copy of the stream object, so the original stream object will be confused by operations going on behind its back.

--efn
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by:Axter
Axter earned 80 total points
ID: 9744832
According to the C++ standard, you're not allowed to pass a stream object by value.

A few compilers, like VC++ 6.0 will let you compile this type of code, but will then crash at run time.

So never pass a stream object by value.  It will either fail to compiler, or crash.
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by:Axter
ID: 9744881
FYI:

Section 27.4.4 of C++ Standard:
private:
basic_ios(const basic_ios& ); // not defined
basic_ios& operator=(const basic_ios&); // not defined

basic_istringstream derives from basic_ios via the following inheritance.

basic_istringstream->basic_istream->basic_ios

The above section of the C++ standard shows the copy constructor and assignment operator as private and not defined.

That means any derived class like ostream can not be pass by value.
In a compliant implementation, you'll get a compile error if you try to pass by value.
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