Setting up a secondary DNS server in Server 2003 ?

I setup a scondary DNS server in a pure Server 2003 environment for redundnacy. After setting my PC to use the secondary server for DNS I expected not to be able to get out to the Internet until I set the appropriate forwarders in the DNS. However, it worked perfectly.

1. Is it getting the forwarder IP address from the Active directory integrated DNS on my other server ?  

2. Should I add in the correct forwarders on the 2nd DNS server or leave it the way it is and why?

Thanks



bwalanAsked:
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adonis1976Commented:
anser to question 1: since it is integrated zone, the second DNS is picking the info from the first one.

answer to question 2: you might want to, because, if the first one goes down, it will not have any information whatsoever about forwarders.

just a tip. Also allow dynamic updates on the DNS console, so that the changes made to one DNS server is replicated to second DNS.
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ralonsoCommented:
I am not (yet) very familiar with 2003, but I believe that your second DNS server is just performing iterative queries by using the root hints it will have by default.

I don't think it will be using the forwarders' configuration from any other server.

(isn't it scary when everyting that microsoft has done for a while is either "dynamic" or "active"...)

Using forwarders (or not) means that instead of running several iterative queries to various DNS servers in the internet you just forward the requests to one (or more) servers. Usually in your ISP. Forwarders allow you to use less bandwith. Still, if the DNS servers in your provider are not available, your server would not resolve names properly.

And taking into account the amount of DNS traffic (small UDP packets), I wouldn't use forwarders unless you have a very small line and a lot of computers.
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