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1 WebServer sharing 2 ADSL Lines? Is it possible!?!?

Posted on 2003-11-17
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Last Modified: 2013-12-14
I run a small web hosting company and am paying through the roof for a dedicated server in Florida when I've got a suitible desktop server with Server 2003 in my office.

I'm thinking of migrating the websites to a dedicated server in our office but have that server use multiple ADSL connections and have the server load balance the packets on both connections.

Were thinking, 2 DSL Modems connecting to a Router then router connecting to the server.  Then use the router to load balance the packets on both lines.  Therefore upload traffic from the server will be split on both lines.  We know this probably wont be possible the other way because the two lines will have seperate IPs but that shouldnt be as much of a problem because the download speed is quicker than upload so we should be ok.

Problem is, we dont know how to get both the DSL modems traffic into 1 IP!

Any ideas?!?

This is to avoid getting a leased line and save £5000 a year!

Thanks
Matt.
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Question by:razorhazor
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Expert Comment

by:svenkarlsen
ID: 9800189
Hi Razor,

Connecting the router to two DSL -lines require that you give the router multiple addresses on the 'public' side.  To do so, you must be a little bit carefull in your choice of ISP, - you will need to have DSL modems that accept the address of your router, and some DSL's are configured to only accept the IP's they've supplied themselves via DHCP.

Choose a good router/firewall with a good config program, - e.g. Cisco Pix 501 or larger. Your money is well spend here!

Your requirements to the ISP is thus: you have a LAN with fixed IP addresses (say: addresses 192.168.1.5-10) on some boxes, - will the modem accept to route IP traffic for them ? Accept any variation in the 3rd number (i.e. 192.168.?.5-10).

If you can get that (two modems with exact same specs on IP access, - i.e. 3rd number in IP address must be the same!), your next step is to configure your router with two public addresses. For this, you must configure NAT for both to ensure traffic flow (of course you will have to config a static PAT/NAT for incoming on one of them, in sync with the config on the DSL modem that will handle your true public IP address).

When NAT/PAT is in place, I suggest you set the two ROUTE configurations on the router to different prices, to achieve some default simple loadshare.

Regards,
Sven
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Author Comment

by:razorhazor
ID: 9809906
Thanks for that Sven, is there anychance you could email me a diagram so I can get my head round it?

emails: <removed by PashaMod for users privacy>

Thanks
Matt
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Expert Comment

by:chicagoan
ID: 9811665
While you can get some outbound load sharing and redundancy having multiple default routes, unless your DSL provider is participating in BGP you won't have redundant routes INTO the enterprise.

You can offset this somewhat by using round robin DNS, where you have two A records for one FQDN.
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Author Comment

by:razorhazor
ID: 9816734
Apologies Mod, is there a way to attach files to the questions? Thats why I asked for an email.
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Author Comment

by:razorhazor
ID: 9816760
Thanks for the diagram Sven very helpful.

Guys, what about say:

1.  client navigates to www.matthayes.com
2.  packets are split and evenly distributed down both ADSL lines
3.  packets are then combined and sent to private LAN server
4.  server then sends packets through both ADSL lines to client
5.  client gets website through both DSL lines

Is this possible??

If so is it possible using a relatively 'normal' ISP?
or is there a hosting company I can move the .com to so I can modify the DNS records?
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Expert Comment

by:svenkarlsen
ID: 9817002
Razor,

You'll be be in deep water to do that.

Communication between host & server is port based. Ports are related to a specific IP address, - you would have to convince not only your server, but also the browsing host, to accept two ports for one session.

Anyhow, I think you're overcomplicating things here, - I assume you'll have more than one client accessing your site, so your need is not to divide each client across the two lines, but to divide all clients across the connections.

Sven
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Accepted Solution

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chicagoan earned 250 total points
ID: 9817117
You can't aggregate the bandwidth of your 2 DSL lines for casual clients.
Any decent ISP will enter multiple addresses in your A record, this is a very old and standard practice.
For a client to benefit from the extra bandwidth, they would have to have as much or more bandwidth than your DSL connections. If your web application needs 1Mbs, the developers need to be fired.

You could kludge up something to another site you controlled or that cooperated with you, but DSL isn't as predictable as dedicated lines and different propagation properties on multiplexed links would play hell with that  idea.

Best practice here, assuming the same ISP and bandwidth for both lines, is two default routes out, round robin DNS in.
You could do routing out based on how busy the interface is as well, but I'd get it working as simply as possible, monitor it with mgrt or whatever you have and see if further tuning is warranted.


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