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Upgrading from Redhat 8 to Redhat 9.

I have a redhat 8 box and I'm thinking of upgrading to 9.
Is the upgrade a simple process or is it more like a rebuild ?
Will I lose all my settings in thinks like KDE and Gnome ?

Any suggestions ?
2 Solutions
All of your settings should be intact but be prepared to wait a long time for the upgrade to finish. Upgrading can take twice as long as a fresh install. Upgrading is not a rebuild. It will just update any packages you have installed.
The installation process for Red Hat Linux 9 includes the ability to upgrade from prior versions of Red Hat Linux (version 6.2 and later) which are based on RPM technology.

Upgrading your system installs the modular 2.4.x kernel as well as updated versions of the packages which are currently installed on your system.

The upgrade process preserves existing configuration files by renaming them with an .rpmsave extension (for example, sendmail.cf.rpmsave). The upgrade process also creates a log of its actions in /root/upgrade.log. As software evolves, configuration file formats can change, so you should carefully compare your original configuration files to the new files before integrating your changes.

It is always a good idea to back up any data that you have on your systems. For example, if you are upgrading or creating a dual-boot system, you should back up any data you wish to keep on your hard drive(s). Mistakes do happen and can result in the loss all of your data.
Some upgraded packages may require the installation of other packages for proper operation. If you choose to customize your packages to upgrade, you may be required to resolve dependency problems. Otherwise, the upgrade procedure takes care of these dependencies, but it may need to install additional packages which are not on your system.

Depending on how you have partitioned your system, the upgrade program may prompt you to add an additional swap file. If the upgrade program does not detect a swap file that equals twice your RAM, it will ask you if you would like to add a new swap file. If your system does not have a lot of RAM (less than 32 MB), it is recommended that you add this swap file.

Have a check here for upgrade procedure http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux/RHL-9-Manual/install-guide/s1-upgrade-begin.html
ozymandiasAuthor Commented:
Thanks guys :0)
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