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Copper Mountain CE150 DSLAM, Netopia 7100 SDSL, and a Linux router

Posted on 2003-11-18
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Last Modified: 2013-11-30
Hi,
I'm trying to configure a system like this:

Linux gateway/router: 10.2.1.1

CE150 DSLAM: 10.2.1.5 and 10.2.200.2 (the second IP is the port that the SDSL Modem syncs with)

Netopia 7100 SDSL Modem behind the DSLAM: 10.2.200.1 and 10.2.200.3 (external and internal IP's)

I need help making this work.  

The linux box can ping the DSLAM.  The Netopia can ping the DSLAM.  Traffic will NOT get passed from the Netopia to the Linux gateway -- the farthest I can ping is the DSLAM.  In other words, traffic can get to the DSLAM from either side (external = linux box, internal = SDSL modem), but no traffic seems to get THROUGH the DSLAM.

Here's the confg on the DSLAM:
System(1.3)> get cmif [1.4.20]
Group: cmIfaceTable
Instance: [1.4.20.0]
PII                  =  1.4.20.0
IfIndex              =  1.4.20.0
Name                 =  RJ45-TEST
GroupName            =  ""
AdditionalInfo       =  ""
NetModel             =  IP
IpAddr               =  10.2.200.2
NetMask              =  255.255.255.0
MacAddr              =  ff.ff.ff.ff.ff.ff
BurnedInMacAddr      =  0.0.c5.72.75.2
FarEndAddr           =  10.2.1.1
DestPII              =  1.3.1.0
CMCPCompatible       =  Yes
EncapsulationType    =  rfc1483
FwdMode              =  IP-Policy
Pix                  =  22
ServiceClass         =  D
System(1.3)>


Here's the configs on the Linux Gateway (eth2 is a live external ip -- I changed it here for privacy):
[zberke@gateway zberke]$ /sbin/route
Kernel IP routing table
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags Metric Ref    Use Iface
192.168.0.200   *               255.255.255.240 U     0      0        0 eth2
10.2.0.0        *               255.255.0.0     U     0      0        0 eth1
127.0.0.0       *               255.0.0.0       U     0      0        0 lo
default         gw.switc 0.0.0.0         UG    0      0        0 eth2


[zberke@gateway network-scripts]$ more ifcfg-eth1
DEVICE=eth1
BOOTPROTO=static
BROADCAST=10.2.255.255
IPADDR=10.2.1.1
NETMASK=255.255.0.0
NETWORK=10.2.0.0
ONBOOT=yes

[zberke@gateway network-scripts]$ more ifcfg-eth2
DEVICE=eth2
ONBOOT=yes
BOOTPROTO=static
IPADDR=129.170.10.68
NETMASK=255.255.255.240
GATEWAY=129.170.10.65

I don't have the config for the DSL Modem in front of me, but I can get it ASAP if this info is not sufficient.  I think it's a problem with the DSLAM config (since traffic is not getting passed) or possibly with the linux routing tables, but I'm not sure.

Thanks in advance for any and all help.

Zach
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Question by:zberke
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8 Comments
 
LVL 16

Expert Comment

by:The--Captain
ID: 9774825
That's a lot of info to digest...  It seems off the top that some of your network numbers may be incongruous, but I'd need to see a network diagram to be sure, ie:

       Internet
           ||
           ||
        Router
           ||
           ||
        Firewall==DMZ
           ||
           ||
        Local Net


Cheersm
-Jon

0
 

Author Comment

by:zberke
ID: 9774901
Here's a diagram:

Internet
   ||
   ||
External Switch 192.168.10.70
       ||
       ||                / 192.168.10.68
    Linux Gateway
        ||              \ 10.2.1.1
        ||
Internal Switch  10.2.1.x
         ||            
         ||      /10.2.1.5    
------DSLAM------------------------------------
||10.2.200.2(dslam port 20)        || 10.2.210.2 (dslam port 21)
||                                             ||
||  /10.2.200.1                           ||    /10.2.210.1
Modem 1...............................Modem N
||  \10.2.200.3                            ||   \10.2.210.3
||                                              ||
clients behind Modem 1             clients behind Modem 2
0
 
LVL 16

Expert Comment

by:The--Captain
ID: 9776730
Muuuuccch clearer...

Running tcpdump on the linux box and then pinging/tracing from the netopias to the linux box will tell you if it's a linux problem or not.  If you detect no packets from the netopias, then it's time to start checking the DSLAM.

When I called into question your network numbers in my first post, I was mainly concerned with the DSLAM<->Modem connection , and the subnet beyond the modems...  Below, you have your two different interfaces on your netopias configured to belong to the same network - this is usually a bad idea, unless you are running the netopias as bridges...  However, I don't think this portion of the netopia config is likely to casue your problem.

          ||      /10.2.1.5    
------DSLAM------------------------------------
||10.2.200.2(dslam port 20)        || 10.2.210.2 (dslam port 21)
||                                             ||
||  /10.2.200.1                           ||    /10.2.210.1
Modem 1...............................Modem N
||  \10.2.200.3                            ||   \10.2.210.3
||                                              ||
clients behind Modem 1             clients behind Modem 2


Cheers,
-Jon

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Author Comment

by:zberke
ID: 9776745
Agreed.  When I tcpdump on the linux box, I don't see any traffic from the netopias (I can ping the DSLAM and attempt to ping the linux box (no luck) and either way I don't see the traffic showing up on the tcpdump).

As you say, most likely a DSLAM problem.  Do you have any experiences configuring one of these CE150's?
0
 

Author Comment

by:zberke
ID: 9776752
Oh, also,
the reason they Netopias have two ip's on the same subnet is that I want them to act as dumb bridges.  All traffic should go from the client, through the netopia, through the DSLAM, and onto the linux box.  The DHCP server is effectively on the linux box.
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LVL 16

Accepted Solution

by:
The--Captain earned 500 total points
ID: 9776898
>I want them to act as dumb bridges

Excellent - that jibes with what I was saying...  Still, do you even want two IPs on each netopia, or is that a requirement of the hardware device?

>DHCP server is effectively on the linux box

I'm not sure DHCP will propagate through your DSLAM unless it has specific setting that allow it to pass DHCP - DHCP should work through bridges, but not routers (since DHCP relies on local network broadcasts).

However, all these concerns are secondary to your main problem, which is apparently the DSLAM not forwarding packets.  I won't lie to you - I have zero experience with your equipment.  I'm starting from the same place you are (maybe even more disadvantaged - you probably already have the docs for your DSLAM, right?).  I'd start doing some google searches, and maybe bug your manufacturer for support...

http://www.mail-archive.com/isp-dsl@isp-dsl.com/msg00878.html

This is a link to some Copper Mountain stuff on a DSL mailing list - you might want to post this question there and see if any of those folks can lend a hand...

Cheers,
-Jon
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