strings - super newbie very easy

ok this is stupid, but i need to test sometihng, just tell me what i should be doing to do what i want.

#include "StdAfx.h"
#include "iostream.h"
#include "windows.h"
char inputpass[20];
int something;
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{

cout << "enter your password please\n \n";


cout <<"\n Password:";
cin >> inputpass;

if ( inputpass != "mysecretpass") something = 1;

return 0;
}
FatNewbieAsked:
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jj819430Commented:
what do you want to do? What are the errors?

#include "StdAfx.h"
#include "iostream.h"
#include "windows.h"

int main()
{
string inputpass;
int something;

cout << "enter your password please\n \n";
cout <<"\n Password:";
cin >> inputpass;

if ( inputpass != "mysecretpass") something = 1;

return 0;
}

That is easier but not neccessarily wrong... Are you doing this in C or C++? You can use C standards with C++ (but you don't have to)
you can just use strings instead of char *;
0
jkrCommented:
#include <string.h>

if ( strcmp ( inputpass, "mysecretpass")) something = 1;

You cannot compare strings using '==' or '!=', at least not when you are using character arrays.
0

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brettmjohnsonCommented:
> if ( inputpass != "mysecretpass")

When used with char * or char[], the == equality operator compares the
addresses of the character strings, not the contents of the strings.  Since
the address of the global character array iputpass will never equal the address
of the character string constant "mysecretpass", the above if statement will
always be true.  To compare the contents of two character strings you will
need to use the strcmp(), strncmp(), stricmp() ... family of library routines.

0
jj819430Commented:
well if you wanted to use the char * method. You would just have to work your way through the list and compare each one.
not efficient but not rediculously troublesome.
and iin my previous comment you need the #include <string.h>

sorry
Jj
0
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