Short questions

1. How can I use just 75% of the screen? So There will be a little bit of screen on the left and right of the screen that I cannot use

2. Now can I have shading under my check boxes?

3. Also normall check boyes are round, how I have square check boxes?

4. In a table such as:
<TABLE width="100%">
 <TR>
  <TD width="49%">Spot </TD>
  <TD><INPUT type="text" name="myCheckbox1" value="" />
  <TD width="49%">&nbsp;</TD>
 </TR>
<TR>
  <TD width="49%">Outright forwards</TD>
  <TD><INPUT type="text" name="myCheckbox2" value="" />
  <TD width="49%">&nbsp;</TD>
 </TR>
 <TR>
  <TD width="49%">Total </TD>
  <TD><INPUT type="text" name="myCheckbox3" value="" />
  <TD width="49%">&nbsp;</TD>
 </TR>
</TABLE>
If I were to pick the input from them in ASP would I say:
Statement=Request.Form("myCheckbox1")
Statement2=Request.Form("myCheckbox2")
Statement3=Request.Form("myCheckbox3")
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knightEknightCommented:
in the table tag, instead of 100% use 75% ... and then put <CENTER> tags around the table
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knightEknightCommented:
like this:

<CENTER>
<TABLE width="75%">

...

</TABLE>
</CENTER>
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seanpowellCommented:
>>Also normal checkboxes are round, how can I have square checkboxes...

Round? Are you sure you're not referring to radio buttons, or have you just been cutting corners in your checkbox code :-)
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dorwardCommented:
(1)

<body style="text-align: center;">
<div style="width: 75%; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; text-align: left;">
<!-- your content -->

(2) Not without jumping through quite a lot of hoops and producing some really ugly code, and then its rather hit and miss.

(3) Normal checkboxes are square, you appear to be using text boxes.

<input type="checkbox" ...>
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ZontarCommented:
Don't use the CENTER tag -- it's out of date.

dorward, will using auto for the left and right margins work to center in MSIE? I don't think it will. Plus there's no need to add an extra DIV. Simply use

<table width="75%" align="center">

this will work for all browsers currently in use.
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dorwardCommented:
Zontar: It will, under some circumstances, the text-align mess is the work around.

<http://dorward.me.uk/www/centre/> has the details.

<table width="75%" align="center"> is just as out of date as <center>

(And I really doubt that anything will work for _all_ browsers currently in use - it just doesn't make sense on, for instance, a browser that outputs to braille)
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ZontarCommented:
All graphical browsers, then.

The center attribute is deprecated but width is not. Using align="center" is in fact better than using the <center> tag because the former does not affect the logical structure of the document, whereas <center> does.

Plus you lose points for using an inline style. <G>

Won't your "fix" screw things up in CSS-compliant browsers? And why use the DIV? Again this is extraneous markup that serves no purpose that I can see.
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dorwardCommented:
> The center attribute is deprecated but width is not.

Width is still presentational markup and should be avoided.

> Using align="center" is in fact better than using the <center> tag
> because the former does not affect the logical structure of the document,
> whereas <center> does.

Still presentational

> Plus you lose points for using an inline style. <G>

Just for the sake of example. External style sheets are of course implied.


> Won't your "fix" screw things up in CSS-compliant browsers?

No

> And why use the DIV? Again this is extraneous markup that serves no purpose that I can see.

You didn't read the document I referenced did you? Its becuase Internet Explorer is a buggy pile of <self censored>. You can get rid of the text-align assignments and the div if you don't mind sacrifing the centring for MSIE 5.x and earlier (and if you ensure that you are in standards mode).
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ZontarCommented:
We'll just have to agree to disagree, then.
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