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Force User Logoff immediately -- User logged on to my Windows 2000 Server

My office manager has been tasked with terminating personnel.  As the IT Administrator, I am tasked with disabling the user account in Active Directory and forcing the user the logoff immediately.

The bottom line is:  When instructed by the office manager, I want to prevent (immediately) all  access to the domain from the terminated employee's computer.

Thanks for your help.
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jimdorman
Asked:
jimdorman
1 Solution
 
Justin CAWS Solutions ArchitectCommented:
Locking out the account will cause the user to not be able to access any networked resources, so you can consider them isolated from the network.  You can set logon hours in the account's properties, and force logoff when logon time expires via Group Policy.  
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jimdormanAuthor Commented:
Well, how do you lockout an account?  I searched the Windows 2000 Server help files and "lockout" only relates to Remoate Access or VPN accounts.

The only way I know to prevent immediate access to the server, is to go to my wiring closet and pull the cat5 cable that is connecting the terminated employee's computer to the router/switch.  However, the terminated employee may go to someone else's computer and log on.

Thanks again for your help.
 
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Justin CAWS Solutions ArchitectCommented:
On either your DC or a managment workstation with the Admin tools installed, open Active Directory Users and Computers, find the user's account, right-click and select Disable.  The change will immediatly replicated to any other DCs in your AD domain and the user will not be able to access network resources.  
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jimdormanAuthor Commented:
Your suggestion worked partially.   I disabled my account through Active Directory on the DC.  I did not log off of my own computer.  I clicked on Outlook.  The Exchange Server did not display any messages in my Inbox (normally there would be about 50).  So by disabling the account, e-mail was disabled.

However, I opened Explorer.  I navigated to the mapped drive on the DC.  (This is where word processing documents are stored).  The DC Server allowed me to read, edit, and print all documents.
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Justin CAWS Solutions ArchitectCommented:
Try enabling "Force logoff when logon hours expire" in Group Policy, then in the account properties in AD set the logon hours so that your test account isn't able to logon in the next half hour or so.  That should force you to log off.
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juliancrawfordCommented:
Why not use shutdown.exe from the resource kit.
Once you have disabled the account in AD shutdown the users PC and they are gone.
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monsterrickCommented:
Remote shutdown is a good idea but the user may already logged on from another machine which you don't know.
One more to try is launch "Computer Management" from the file server.  Open "Shared Folders".  Click "Sessions".  Find the user session, sort it by "User" and locate the user.  Then, delete his/her session(s) after you disabled this user account.
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