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How do I connect (bridge) two networks together?

Posted on 2003-11-19
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In my office, I am on LAN #1 (3 pc's, all 3 running win98(SE), DHCP on linksys router, dsl internet access).  

A fellow associate wants me to help draft Microsoft Word documents on his server.  I would like to access files on LAN #2 (2 pc's, Windows 2000 Server, DHCP on linksys router, dsl internet access).

 
Both lans have there own routers.  The routers  are located in my wiring closet.  Both routers  are about "two feet" in distance from each other.  Both routers are running DHCP.  

I am not that smart in setting up a VPN on Lan #2's server.

Can I just connect a cable from my router to his router?

How can I made this happen?  Thanks again for your help.
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Question by:jimdorman
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by:stevenlewis
ID: 9783068
Easiest way would be to install a second NIC on your box, run another cable to his router
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by:stevenlewis
ID: 9783076
He's running w2k server, so he will have to add you (as a user) so you can access his machine
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by:jimdorman
ID: 9783234
Can I just connect a cat5 cable from router1 to router2?  I have already added the user accounts on the w2k server.
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by:stevenlewis
ID: 9783354
You can try it, but you'll need a crossover cable, not a straight cat5. I think you'll get errors (both routers giving out addresses in the 192.168.0.x range (the default scope for D-Link))
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by:ErnieExpert
ID: 9798614
yes, I agree with stevenlewis.  I think you will get ip conficts - if you are talking about running the crossover cable from an inside port(port used for clients) on one router to an inside port on another.  If your outside (WAN) port was not being used by your DSL connection, you could maybe plug the crossover into those and setup a VPN.
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svenkarlsen earned 500 total points
ID: 9800479
Jim,

It is possible, but it will require that you have access to configuring at least one of the routers, - if you have that,

1. config one routers DHCP to supply IP addresses in another range than the other router (e.g. if DHCP scope of router 1 is 192.168.1.5 -32, then configure the router to have 192.168.1.33-64)

2. change private IP address of one of the routers, as they probably are identical (likely something like 192.168.1.1, - change one of them to an address not in any of the two DHCP scopes)

3. check any pc and server on both network, - if they use fixed IP (i.e. not DHCP/automatic IP), then make sure that no conflict exist or change addresses accordingly to something outside DHCP scopes

4. For DHCP scope on the router where you chnage it, be sure to change the default gateway supplied via DHCP to be the same as the routers new private IP.

 - - so you see: it's easier to follow Steven's suggestion: install an extra NIC on his server and your box, and draw a cable directly from his server to your box:

If you do so, set a different network on his server and your box for this connection:

 - again, run IPCONFIG in a DOS-window on each box to obtain their IP addresses
 - select a network out of any of the two scopes (if both have a scope like 192.168.?.?, just make sure that the third part (first ?) is not used - e.g. LAN 1 uses 192.169.1.x, LAN 2 uses 192.168.0.x, - then set you subnet to 192.168.10.?, - iving the two boxes the addresses 192.168.10.5 & ...6)
 - set IP address to fixed (not automatic) on the new NIC in both boxes
 - when mapping a network drive on your workstation to his server, use the IP address:
        e.g. \\192.168.10.5\d$ (for a drive) or \\192.168.10.5\ShareName (for a share)


Have fun!

Sven




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