Subroutine library calls in Perl

In Perl, I have created a file containing several shared subroutines ("subrout.lib") and then including the command "require 'subrout.lib';" in each script that references one or more of the subroutines.  That works well except when a script calls itself (for instance, to replot the screen with the data sorted differently).  It clearly accesses the subroutines the first time, but does not access them in subsequent calls.

When I include the shared subroutines in each script, everything works fine.  That obviously increases the size of my scripts and is no fun to maintain.  Before I proceed, I thought I would ask what is the best way to (a) set up a library of subroutines and (b) call a subroutine from that library.
ryuusekiAsked:
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djplaistowCommented:
For a package named DBUtilities, which by convention would be stored in a file named DBUtilities.pm, the begining would look like:

    package DBUtilities;

    require Exporter;
    @ISA = qw(Exporter);
    @EXPORT = (SqlFunction AnotherFunc); # List all subroutines and variables that will be automatically
                                                                   # exported to all scripts that use the module
    @EXPORT_OK = qw(Func1 $globalDsn  @tables); # List all subroutines and variables that will be exported
                                                                                  # to all scripts that explicitly name them

Then a script that wants to use subroutines and/or variables that are within DBUtilities would add a line like:

    use DBUtilities qw(SqlFunction @tables);

Thus, the script will have acces to the subroutines SqlFunction (which it did not have to explicitly request),  and AnotherFunc, and the variable @tables. However, it will not have access to the subroutine Func1 or the variable $globalDsn as it would have had to explicitly request them.
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djplaistowCommented:
I forgot to spell out the answer to "(b) call a subroutine from that library." Once you have included the line like:

    use DBUtilities qw(SqlFunction @tables);

You treat it as if the code for the function is within the script itself; it is analogous to the C++ using namespace construct.
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ozoCommented:
How does it fail when a script calls itself?
Could you give an example of code that does not work the way you think it should?
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ahoffmannCommented:
before converting to packages, could you please post the require and the exec (itself) part of your script
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ryuusekiAuthor Commented:
I appreciate the comments.  Honestly, I was hoping there would be a simpler answer than working with packages.

In theory, should the calls using require work?  Is there any inherent problem with this method?  The scripts are on our internal server, and too large to post in this forum.  I can try to write a smaller script that replicates the failure, but I'd rather put my efforts toward proper technique if this method is not recommended.
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ryuusekiAuthor Commented:
*sigh*  Just when I think I understood something, I realize I really didn't.

The failure appears to be related to the scoping of "my" variables.  I have always used strict scoping with "my" variables.  What I didn't quite understand was the concept of packaged scoping of the "my" vars.

Simply put, in the following example, $v2 is visible to the subroutine "test":

(main.pl)
use strict;
my($v1) = "VAR 1";
my($v2) = "VAR 2";
print "$v1\n";
print "$v2\n";
&test();

sub test {
  print "$v2\n"; }

If I change it to the following, $v2 is not visible to "test":

(main.pl)
use strict;
require "subrout.lib";
my($v1) = "VAR 1";
my($v2) = "VAR 2";
print "$v1\n";
print "$v2\n";
&test();

(subrout.lib)
sub test {
  print "$v2\n"; }

1;

By changing "my($v2)" to "our($v2)" it becomes visible outside of the "main" package.

I'm still not sure why the complicated script works the first time through but not on subsequent calls.  I'll have to dig deeper to figure that out.


In the meantime, I'd still appreciate comment regarding my previous comment re: the propriety of using require.
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rkosaiCommented:
To allieviate problems such as these, as well as making code easier to read (and following "better" coding practices), it is usually recommended to make each of your subroutines isolated from each other.  This avoids many problems, including ones like this.

So, alternatively, you'd write code like this.

use strict;
require "subrout.lib";
my $v1 = "VAR 1";
my $v2 = "VAR 2";
print "$v1\n";
print "$v2\n";
test($v2); #prints $v2

# -- (subrout.lib) --
sub test {
  shift; #captures the arguments to the subroutine, and stores them in $_
  print "$_\n"; }

1;
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