enom ultra fast dynamic DNS?

at http://www.enom.com/help/dnsdemo.asp they say :
This page is designed to showcase our Dynamic DNS. eNom has developed a revolutionary way to update DNS settings. This allows the user to make DNS changes that will apply within approximately 4 seconds. Compare that to the "12 to 24 hours" needed for most domain registrars or the "several days" by some ISPs.

This page also demonstrates the use of the four most common Hostnames (@, www, *, and "any text"), and what "Record Types" do.


can any body explain exactly how they are doing it?
how can you do it with a free service?
how can I view the TTL for http://my-domain-name08.net?
can it be done for sub domain as well?
will new sub domains be propagate faster?
can it be done for email as well?
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noam_dzAsked:
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chicagoanCommented:
>can any body explain exactly how they are doing it?
>how can you do it with a free service?
It looks like it's just the authoritative server that's being dynamically updated, I made a change on the page and got
ttl = 172647 (1 day 23 hours 57 mins 27 secs) from comcast though it did update their servers immediatly
(dns1.name-services.com), so it's just a web front end to modify their zone records. The thing with BIND is that you have to reload the zone files to apply changes and most ISP's only like to do that on a schedule.
They don't have TXT record for version.bind but they may be obfuscating it for security, so we don't know what named they're running or platform (I hesitate to probe them, it just ain't friendly)

>how can I view the TTL for http://my-domain-name08.net?
nslookup
set debug
server (your server or theirs (dns1.name-services.com))
my-domain-name08.net

>can it be done for sub domain as well?
y not?
>will new sub domains be propagate faster?
Nothing will be propagated faster.
>can it be done for email as well?
The MX records will be updated immediatly but you still have to wait for the TTL to expire on all the servers your correspondents are using.




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noam_dzAuthor Commented:
>how can I view the TTL for http://my-domain-name08.net?
is there an online tool that you know of?

I understand it's just a web front end to modify their zone records.

but if the "ttl = 172647" and "you have to reload the zone files to apply changes and most ISP's only like to do that on a schedule."

how does it change so quickly?

enom says "DNS changes that will apply within approximately 4 seconds. " is this correct always?
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chicagoanCommented:
>is there an online tool that you know of?
http://networking.ringofsaturn.com/Tools/nslookup.php


>how does it change so quickly?
Their server changes quickly. Neither my DNS server nor my ISP's changed immediatley.
I did a lookup before I submitted the change to their web page, the entries in my DNS and Comcast's were cached and did not change until the TTL expired.


>enom says "DNS changes that will apply within approximately 4 seconds. " is this correct always?
Their DNS servers (I only looked at one) seem to change the record more or less immediately.
I didn't do it enough times to have a statisticly significant enough sample of results to say "always" and I hate making sweeping generalizations.

My dynamic dns provider, dyndns, has a similar system. It beats calling or emailing your DNS host, but it doesn't have any effect on propagation to the world. If a DNS server has the record cached it's not going to look it up again until the TTL expires and you can't have insanely short TTL's or there wouldn't be any point to caching. That environment would put such huge demands on the DNS infrastructure that you'd have to pay-per-lookup to support it.
As hardware and bandwidth get cheaper we may see TTL's coming down to an hour or so, but you're not going to get 4 second world wide propagation in this year's Christmas stocking.


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The--CaptainCommented:
Enom is just using typical marketspeak to appear that they can do something others can't (which is completely misleading, if not an outright lie).

The "12 to 24 hours" figure they are citing is usually used in reference to new domain propagation.  Enom cannot speed this up, period.  

Once the new domain has been inserted into the appropriate root/gtld server, changes to the domain should propagate at least as fast as the TTL for the individual zone records.  Once again though, this is misleading - mickeysoft, in their infinite wisdom, has released numerous operating system version that ignore TTL in favor of their own settings.  So, no matter how low Enom sets their TTLs, you will face problems getting all the mickeysoft OSs out there to recognize your changes in a timely fashion.

Also, I don't buy that they set their TTLs to 4 seconds.  This would translate to an awful lot of pounding on their DNS servers.  Likely they mean that your changes are reflected in their zone files within 4 seconds, which has little to do with propagation speed.

So basically, there is no magic, or trade secrets, or anything else special about enom - all they are promising is that they will update their own servers in a timely fashion (which admittedly can be a problem at other registrars).

>how can I view the TTL for http://my-domain-name08.net?

'dig' oughta do it...  Google should be able to point you to some sites that host online versions of DNS tools if you find yourself without 'dig'...

Cheers,
-Jon

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noam_dzAuthor Commented:
FROM

http://www.analogx.com/cgi-bin/cgidig.exe?DNS=205.214.45.10&Query=http%3A%2F%2Fmy-domain-name08.net%2F&Type=1&submit=Lookup

the TTL is

 NameServer 1 of 1:  
 
Name:   .  .  
Type:   6  SOA  
Class:   1  IN  
TTL:   3600  1h 0m 0s  
RDLength:   64  62  
RData:  Refresh=30m 0s, Retry=15m 0s, Expire= 1d 0h 0m 0s, Minimum=1d 0h 0m 0s  

if it is 1h how come it takes affect this quickly?
will I get the same from every server I do it? or is this per the server which made the query?
if so how can I see the TTLthey publish?

using
nslookup
set debug
server (your server or theirs (dns1.name-services.com))
my-domain-name08.net

I got 1h as well.
>Also, I don't buy that they set their TTLs to 4 seconds.  This would translate to an awful lot of >pounding on their DNS servers.  Likely they mean that your changes are reflected in their zone >files within 4 seconds, which has little to do with propagation speed

how can this be checked online?
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chicagoanCommented:
>if it is 1h how come it takes affect this quickly?
A ttl is a value in the zone file. When another DNS server queries the authoritative server, it learn that this entry will expire in an hour (which it can ignore).

Changes to the zone file aren't related to the TTL, when the zone file is edited and reloaded the new information is available to anyone who queries THAT server. If another DNS server queried it 1 second before the change was made, it won't query it again until the TTL expires.

> four second TTL
You can check the TTL of any entry the same way, just change the server address to the one who's entry you want to check
nslookup
set debug
server (your server or theirs (dns1.name-services.com))
my-domain-name08.net

as i said, even if enom set the ttl to 4 seconds (which they don't say they do) and they don't it was set to 1 hour, most other dns would ignore it as an insanely small numer that would make caching entries useless, and caching is what DNS work reasonable quickly
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