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Clone a drive

Posted on 2003-11-21
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Last Modified: 2013-12-29
In the bad old days some system files had to be in specific sectors, I assume that's not necessary now, so can I copy an entire drive by booting from a dos floppy and doing a   copy C:\*.* D: /v   or would it be 'safer' to load W98 onto the new drive first (as C:) and then do the Dos copy?
 I would feel better about doing the copy from dos so there's no chance of attempting to copy any system files that could be open.

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Question by:frog
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by:speyfisher
ID: 9795498
copying the windows directory sturcture and file won't recreate the bootsector necessary to make the disk bootable.  norton's Ghost or power quest's Drive Image will do this very easily.
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by:Huseyin1
ID: 9795541
Hi

...........or you could load windows on D: and then just copy the data from C: (not the sys file, just data) to the D:\

Go for the software above, very hassle free.

H
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Expert Comment

by:adminhk
ID: 9795869
You could download a copy of Norton Ghost, this creates a complete clone boot sectors and all, and usually takes about 5mins to complete depending on the size of the Drive, and the speed.
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by:adminhk
ID: 9795877
Also you can create an image of the harddrive burn it to cd and if anything should go wrong with the drive then you can restore it from the image
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dbrunton earned 125 total points
ID: 9799050
You do it using xcopy or xxcopy

The command is xcopy c:\*.*  d:\*.*   /s /e /v /h /c /y

You'll need to copy xcopy onto your floppy disk to do  this.

Now here's the problem.  The long file names WON'T copy across.  And thus the disk won't be duplicated correctly and apps won't open up.

You CAN slave your disk to your system.  Just disconnect the CDROM drive and plug your second hard disk there.  Make sure nothing is running and run the xcopy command mentioned above from a dos window under Windows 98.  That'll duplicate your disk for you.  There should only be one open file it can't copy and that's the swap file.   The /c switch above will take care of that problem and the swap file will be rebuilt on boot up.

Or do a search on the InterNet for xxcopy.  That's free for personal use.

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