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How to route two different ip ranges

Posted on 2003-11-21
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Hello,

In my company we have 2 floors.
1st floor has a router, a switch and 22 PCs
2nd floor has a router, a switch and 14 PCs

I use static IPs and since I use two different ISPs I have a different IP range for the PCs on the 1st floor and a different IP range for the 2nd floor.

There is a cable (1Gbps) that connects the two switches (both have 2 Gigabit ports and 24 10/100 ports - but are not of the same company).

The thing is that now when I send something to a computer from the 1st floor to the 2nd, it goes through the Internet and now through the uplink!!! Which is not what I had in mind... :)

Is there a way to route those two ip ranges so that they connect to each other via uplink and not via Internet?

Do I have to use some kind of specific router? Or a software router can do it too?

Thnx
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Question by:gtxnet
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7 Comments
 
LVL 43

Expert Comment

by:JFrederick29
ID: 9796414
Switches only know layer 2 information (Mac addresses) and since you are using different IP ranges the GB line between the two switches does you no good unless the switches have layer 3 capabilities...

If not, you need to connect the two routers together, not the switches, then set static routes to your different networks and a default route to point to the internet.  What kind of routers are you using?
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LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:NicBrey
ID: 9796462
hi there
The easiest way to do this is to add a secondary IP address on the first floor router out of the second floor address range.
Then add a static route on 1st floor router that point to address of 2nd floor router and vice versa.

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LVL 18

Expert Comment

by:chicagoan
ID: 9796684
If the switches are connected to the routers, and the switches are connected to each other, you need to modify your routing tables on the the routers to point use the INSIDE address of the other subnets.

The optimal way to configure such a network would be to have all the workstations in the same subnet to avoid having to route at all. If there are security or bandwidth considerations for segmenting the floors this would normally be accomplished with VLANs.

In that scenario, you could use your two ISP connections in a fault tolerant and bandwidth sharing fashion by running BGP or at least having two default routes. If you're using world routeable addresses inside, I'd strongly suggest you consider renumbering to private IP and using NAT.

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Author Comment

by:gtxnet
ID: 9796748
@JFrederick29

I use ADSL routers from Zyxel (Prestige 650R-33 and Prestige 650H-33)
I really don't understand what you are telling me about static routes.. I'm new to this... If you are bored explaining me could you please give me some links which I could visit to learn something?

@NicBrey

I don't know if I can add a secondary IP to my router. They are pretty simple routers and not some kind of Cisco's :)


@All :)

I also use WinRoute Firewall... If I install it in two machines (one in the 1st floor and one in the 2nd) will it be of any help? Will it be easier?
WinRoute has support of Routing Tables and Static Routes (which I haven't seen in my adsl modem/routers)
0
 

Author Comment

by:gtxnet
ID: 9796791
@chicagoan

I have public IPs on all PC because some programms don't run behind NAT.
Also I don't think that my routers support fault tollerant connections eg. when the primary fails then the secondary comes up.
Actually I have to use all the bandwidth of the two ADSL connections.

Also the IP range I was provided from each ISP is not enough to handle all PCs.
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LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:NicBrey
ID: 9796915
If you can't configure secondary IP addresse you will need some other router to route between the subnets.
Use a operating system that supports routing like Linux or Windows 2000/XP.  Install 2 network cards in it, one for each subnet.
Then you add routes on the router pointing to the router PC.
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LVL 18

Accepted Solution

by:
chicagoan earned 750 total points
ID: 9796991
You can have more than one address on a windows network interface and WinRoute Pro supports this.
You can assign a private ip address to each of the kerio machines in the same subnet.
say, 10.0.0.1 255.255.255.0 gateway 10.0.0.2 for one and 10.0.0.2 255.255.255.0 gateway 10.0.0.1 for the other
Since they're on the same switch, they can now communicate.
Next, in the Kerio administration, enter a route to the other network using the private IP address you just entered as the target.





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