?
Solved

Stop Multicast Session from flooding Network

Posted on 2003-11-21
6
Medium Priority
?
2,346 Views
Last Modified: 2012-08-14
I am using Symantec Ghost 7.0. Every time I run multicast server the network performance is reduced by more than half. So i figured if can stop the multicast packets from leaving the switch where all the clients are connected I can stop the unnecessary traffic. Allow me to explain the current scenario. There is a workbench were all stations on the work bench are connected to a Cisco Catalyst 3524. Port 24 on the catalyst is connected to a parent Switch via a cross over cable. A DHCP server and the Proxy Server are connected to the PARENT Switch, which is how the computers on the workbench get their IP addressee and access the internet. NOTE!!! ONLY computers on the workbench need to access the Symantec Multicast Server. So I think I can add an access statement to the switch to stop all outgoing packets from Symantec Multicast on Switch Port 24. The question is how does Symantec Multicast server send information to their clients, and how do the clients find the Multicast Server? Is it a particular port or a particular packet or what?
0
Comment
Question by:gbarrientos
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
6 Comments
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:MaxQ
ID: 9800040
If the switches aren't configured for IGMP/CGMP, they will forward multicasts as if they were broadcasts.
Once multicast is configured on the network devices they will only forward multicast frames to stations that join the multicast group in question.  As with most network things there is more than one way to do it, but these links should be helpful:

http://service1.symantec.com/SUPPORT/ghost.nsf/docid/2000022806431025?Open&src=&docid=2000033111503625&nsf=ghost.nsf&view=docid&dtype=&prod=&ver=&osv=&osv_lvl=

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/switches/ps637/products_configuration_guide_chapter09186a008007d248.html#xtocid109398
0
 
LVL 18

Expert Comment

by:chicagoan
ID: 9800212
or vlan your lab
0
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:MaxQ
ID: 9800263
That's true, having the lab on its own subnet would keep the multicasts contained and
allow you to do some access control between it and the rest of your network.  Not a
bad idea for security if you potentially have workstations/servers there being built that
aren't fully patched/configured/etc.
0
Percona Live Europe 2017 | Sep 25 - 27, 2017

The Percona Live Open Source Database Conference Europe 2017 is the premier event for the diverse and active European open source database community, as well as businesses that develop and use open source database software.

 
LVL 1

Expert Comment

by:ThePowderedToastMan
ID: 9800340
You certainly can control precisely where a multicast is sent.  An IGMP packet goes anywhere on the set of IP addresses within the LAN it is programmed on.  You can control this by programming groups for multicasting on your routers.  THis is exactly what MaxQ and Chicagoan are saying, so give me no points.  A best solution, in my never to be humble opinion is to go with CHicagoan, and VLAN, your lab, this will eliminate all unwanted traffic to your lab.,
0
 
LVL 12

Accepted Solution

by:
Scotty_cisco earned 1500 total points
ID: 9800672
gbarrientos

I understand your problem we have had a similar issue... One nice thing that I wanted to bring up though is the development of IGMP snooping in 3550 switches and the 2950 switches which will do the IP IGMP joins on a port level and allow you to remain on the same switch without VLANing or messing with segmenting your network.  Let me clarify that statment --- the switch will watch for a join on a group before it floods the multicast out that port. Very low level stuff but it seems to work ... one problem is that it does cause a performance hit on the switch.

Thanks
Scott
0
 
LVL 18

Expert Comment

by:chicagoan
ID: 9814702
surgical, scotty! wtg!
now - can you get us warp 10?
0

Featured Post

NFR key for Veeam Agent for Linux

Veeam is happy to provide a free NFR license for one year.  It allows for the non‑production use and valid for five workstations and two servers. Veeam Agent for Linux is a simple backup tool for your Linux installations, both on‑premises and in the public cloud.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

This article will inform Clients about common and important expectations from the freelancers (Experts) who are looking at your Gig.
This article is a collection of issues that people face from time to time and possible solutions to those issues. I hope you enjoy reading it.
Internet Business Fax to Email Made Easy - With  eFax Corporate (http://www.enterprise.efax.com), you'll receive a dedicated online fax number, which is used the same way as a typical analog fax number. You'll receive secure faxes in your email, f…
In this video we outline the Physical Segments view of NetCrunch network monitor. By following this brief how-to video, you will be able to learn how NetCrunch visualizes your network, how granular is the information collected, as well as where to f…
Suggested Courses
Course of the Month12 days, 21 hours left to enroll

777 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question