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How do I break out of terminal commands?

Posted on 2003-11-22
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Last Modified: 2012-06-21
Okay, this is an easy one.  I'm learning Linux and don't know the Windows equivalent to Ctrl-Break.

For example, I type "ping yahoo.com" at a terminal prompt and it just keeps going.... how do I stop it.  Another example is the "top" command, how do I exit the utility??

I'm stuck in a Windows world and want to escape soon!
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Question by:chadly2
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by:chadly2
ID: 9803205
I figured it out, Ctrl-C or Ctrl-Z.... but what's the difference.  Does one Kill the process versus End?
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arjanh earned 50 total points
ID: 9803305
Ctrl-c is indeed for cancelling something.

ctrl-z is for putting something in the background. This can be handy for long-lasting commands and you want to do something else on the same command prompt... After ctrl-z you can give the command 'bg' to continue the process in the background. The results of the ping will still be printed though. With 'fg' you can bring the command back to the foreground.
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by:arjanh
ID: 9803314
'top' can also be exited by pressing 'q' by the way
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