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WEBSITE ADDRESS: IP

Posted on 2003-11-22
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Last Modified: 2009-12-16
I've noticed a few websites (an example listed below) that have IP's for the address... How do I host my website on my computer and make it accessible by an IP address like that? What software do I need and do you have some sites I can look at with tutorials or something?

Thanks..

Example: http://208.16.234.92
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Question by:TheL00KER
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by:sunray_2003
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Dear TheL00KER,

You basically should have a web server running in your machine.. Web server depends on what OS you have..
If you have windows operating system , you can have IIS or PWS.. If you have other OS you can have web servers that would work in that OS

Thanks,
Sunray
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by:sunray_2003
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You need to make sure your IP doesnot change often.. If it changes you need to get Static IP from your ISP so that everyone can access the same IP all the time .. Once you setup your webserver , you can put html files in there and people using the IP address assigned to you to access your website

Sunray
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by:TheL00KER
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I've installed IIS on Windows XP Pro.. I configured it I guess... And I understand where to put the files and stuff but my IP is 192.168.1.102 (assigned for the site) and when I go to it, it requires authentication that I have no idea what it is.

How do I make it so it doesnt display the authorize prompt? If I go to it by http://computer_name -- it works.
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by:sunray_2003
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DO you have a router ? in that case your IP would be that .. You need to do port forwarding in your router so that if user check out that IP address , your IIS server can serve the files

SUnray
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by:nltech
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you need to assign the system running iis a static address, such as 192.168.1.10, and enter your isp's dns server information... and on your router, you need to forward port 80 to that system's static ip... port forwarding wont work if your client systems use dhcp, and when you use a static ip, the client will not get dns information from the router -- so both a static ip and dns must be entered on the system running iis.

the address you'll give out will be your ip address you get from your isp, not the private net 192.168.xxx.xxx number.  go to www.whatsmyip.org to find out what it is. if you have a "regular" account with your isp, chances are it (your ip address) will change each time you connect to the net. it would be best to get a static ip address from your isp, most cable and dsl providers charge extra per month for one.... if not an option, there are a variety of online services out there that can forward web requests to your machine. www.tzo.com is one such place (not free, but they are inexpensive and have a bunch of service options).

as far as authorization goes - make sure your default web site and files are accessible to public internet users, not just authenticated users of the computer iis is running on...
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by:TheL00KER
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hi, the router configuration says DHCP is enabled. So now what?
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by:IGneon10
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You could also have your site hosted, and just find out the IP address the server is using.
In a DOS prompt, type "nslookup www.someurl.com" without the quotes.
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by:jaysolomon
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http://www.whatismyipaddress.com/

is where you can get your ip addy
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by:yans
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Hi
Hwn you run IIS
Basicly you have already have your site on air,
if you want to make it work. with your coputer name, well it will work just type:
http:\\YourComputerName
or
http:\\Localhost

HowEvere people around the net will access your site through ip,
to know your ip, you have to go to command line
and type:
ipconfig /all

remmember everytime you connect to the net, you get a defferent ip, no metter if you gave your NetCard an other ip,
simply, when you connect to the net u use PPP protoco not tcp/ip.
So....stop reading and show your site to the world!!!:)

Have fun
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by:Webmonkey
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Hi TheL00ker,

Let me clear a couple of things up for you first.

The reason you get prompted for authentication when visiting http://192.168.1.102 but not when you visit http://computer_name is because whenever IE sees a dot (.) in the address line, it automatically assumes that you are in the Internet zone and applies those security settings.  When you visit http://computer_name, there is no dot in the address, so IE assumes that you are in the Intranet zone, and a different set of rules apply.  When you are in the Intranet zone, your credentials (or authentication) are sent *automatically*.  So actually, you are still authenticating, you just don't see it.  This is how most corporate Intranet web site work.

Now, by your question, can I assume that you are using a dial-up, cable modem or DSL ISP?  If so, you're not going to like the answer I'm about to give you.  First let me explain a little.

The 192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255 block of IP addresses are reserved as Network Address Translation (NAT) addresses.  What this means to you is, when you connect to your ISP, they give you a NATed (or private) IP address.  Let's say its 192.168.1.102.  Now, when you go out to the Internet, your request goes to your ISP which then records your local IP address and passes your request out to the Internet.  Once the web site you requested responds, the information headed back to you is sent back to your ISP's IP address which then recalls your local IP address and the information is sent back to you.  The stickler with this method is that with large ISP's, they could have several thouand public IP addresses.  Which means that your public IP address that your ISP assigns to you could change, with each request out to the Internet.

I know by now you're thinking, "Ok, but what does this have to do with me?", so let's get back to your problem.  The problem you are facing is that when the request for information is originated out in the vassive Internet, your ISP doesn't know which private IP address to sent the request to, so it drops it.  

Here's where I get to give the good and bad news.  The good news is there is a way around this.  Your ISP could assign you a static private IP address (so that you will always have the same 192.168.x.x address), after which they can create a static route (in their router) for one of their public IP addresses to your private address.  This way if someone tries to pull up a web site at (for example) http://132.187.43.54, your ISP's router would know to translate that to http://192.168.45.2.  Cool huh?

The bad news is that most ISP's will not do this for you, or if they will they will charge you an extra monthly fee for this service.

Ah but wait, there's more good news.  Just as nltech mentioned, there are several companies on the Internet that will help you get past all of this.  One example can be found at http://www.dynip.com/main/session//rsid//ns/111/doc/37.  

I hope I have been able to help (or at least educate).

Webmonkey
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by:phillllllllll
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>> My IP is 192.168.1.102 <<

AHH! I just... wanted to mention that I thought it very strange that MY IP address is actually 192.168.1.2 (and it used it to be .100; I changed it).

Would you happen to live near here and/or have the same ISP or something?

I know this really has nothing to do with the question; sorry.
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by:IGneon10
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phillllllllll,
The 192.162.x.x block is reserved for internal network IP addresses.  Go to http://www.whatismyipaddress.com/ to get your real IP address.
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by:IGneon10
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Sorry, that should read 192.168.x.x
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by:phillllllllll
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Suuuuure it is.
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by:IGneon10
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Yes, it's your external IP.  If you don't believe me, go to http://www.whatismyip.com/ for a second opinion.
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by:pinaldave
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No comment has been added to this question in more than 21 days, so it is now classified as abandoned.

I will leave the following recommendation for this question in the Cleanup topic area:
    Split: sunray_2003[50] {http:#9805040} & Webmonkey [50]{http:#9842298}

Any objections should be posted here in the next 4 days. After that time, the question will be closed.

pinaldave
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