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How to disable Date/Time Properties

Posted on 2003-11-23
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Last Modified: 2013-12-29
I own a tanning salon.  I have a computer that runs Windows 98.  This is a stand alone system that runs the tanning salon software.  The database time runs off of windows time.  When you adjust the date or time in windows, it reflects the same change in the salon software.  

It has come to my attention that some employees (possibly those trying to mask their lateness) are changing the windows time (which changes the database time) before they clock in.  This allows them to clock in on time.  They then switch it back.

Worse than this, if they get more creative, they could easily hide cash sales on a different date and pocket the cash.

How can I disable the time/date properties in Windows 98??  Better yet, how do I prevent them from accessing most ANYTHING outside of the database software (the date/time is the most important.)  

Thanks for the help!!
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Question by:Wayoff1
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by:Asta Cu
ID: 9805807
For IE - Kiosk Mode may be the solution for you while on the Internet (if you even want that accessed) ...
How to Use Kiosk Mode in Microsoft Internet Explorer
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=http://support.microsoft.com:80/support/kb/articles/q154/7/80.asp&NoWebContent=1

Also this is very insightful and available through Windows 98 disk (Resource Kit)
More details here:
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/treeview/default.asp?url=/technet/prodtechnol/win98/reskit/part4/wrkc20.asp

Mandatory profiles can be used to enforce consistent desktops. This is useful for novice users who cannot manage their own desktop settings. Mandatory profiles increase user productivity and ease the burden of training and support for system managers
See Also
For more information about remote administration, see Chapter 23, "System and Remote Administration Tools."
For more information about creating system policies, see Chapter 8, "System Policies."
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/treeview/default.asp?url=/technet/prodtechnol/win98/reskit/part2/wrkc07.asp
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by:Asta Cu
ID: 9805810
System Policies resource here:  http://www.microsoft.com/technet/treeview/default.asp?url=/technet/prodtechnol/win98/reskit/part2/wrkc07.asp

You can use system policies to enforce system configuration. You can restrict what users are allowed to do from the desktop and what they are allowed to configure using Control Panel. Also, you can use system policies to centrally configure network settings, such as the network client configuration options and the ability to install or configure file and printer sharing services. Finally, you can use policies to customize such parts of the desktop as Network Neighborhood and the Programs folder.

You can change registry settings with System Policy Editor. You can use System Policy Editor to change many common registry settings for an individual computer, either local or remote. You can use these settings in a system policy file to change registry values on multiple computers.

You can apply system policies individually or for a group. You can use group policies to define a set of policies to be applied on the basis of membership in the groups already defined on a Windows NT or Novell NetWare network. Group policies make computer management on the corporate network easier by using the current administrative organization of users.

Windows 98 provides a set of policies that you can use to specify settings for users. You can also add new registry settings to this set of policies, or you can modify policy templates to create new custom policies for any applications that use the Windows 98 registry.

Important If you want to specify desktop, shell, and security settings for your organization as they relate to the Internet Explorer 4 (IE) browsing software or any part of the IE browsing software suite, use the Internet Explorer Administration Kit (IEAK) Profile Manager. The Profile Manager is an administrative tool that is automatically installed on your computer when you install the Windows 98 Resource Kit from the compact disc. The Profile Manager controls system policies for the IE browsing software suite. See Chapter 6, "Configuring the Active Desktop and Active Channels," and Chapter 20, "Internet Access and Tools," for more information.

Choosing to Use System Policies or Mandatory User Profiles  

Much more detail at the above link.
Before deciding to implement system policies, you should consider the following issues:

What types of restrictions and settings would you like to define and manage centrally? For example, do you want to limit access to the MS-DOS prompt and other applications, or to Control Panel options, or do you want to implement a standard desktop for all users?
Do you want to use one set of standard settings for all users and computers, or do you want to customize settings by groups of users? Also, do you want to maintain individual settings for users and computers? Typically, you customize settings by groups, so that the majority of users are in groups (such as Accounting, Marketing, and so on), and a small group of individuals (such as administrators) have special privileges. If so, you must install special files to support group policies.
Will you be using user system policies (as opposed to defining only computer policies)? If so, enable user profiles on the computers running Windows 98, and make sure that the computers use 32-bit, protected-mode network clients.
Do system policies in Windows 98 meet your system administration needs, or do you need a more sophisticated system? If you need a high level of administrative control, you might want to consider using a more sophisticated management software tool, such as Microsoft Systems Management Server, rather than System Policy Editor. For information, see Appendix E, "Microsoft Systems Management Server."

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by:Asta Cu
ID: 9805813
To install group policies
In Control Panel, double-click Add/Remove Programs, click the Windows Setup tab, and then click System Tools.
Select the checkbox for Group Policies, click OK, and then click OK again.
Important System policies are based on the content of the registry and cannot be edited with a text editor. To define and manage system policies, use System Policy Editor and other supporting tools.

You can, however, use a text editor to edit the template files used by System Policy Editor, as described in "Using System Policy Templates" later in this chapter. If you want to use system policies, perform the following preliminary steps:

On the administrator's computer, install System Policy Editor from the Netadmin\Poledit directory on the Microsoft Windows 98 Resource Kit compact disc. Decide which users can install and have access to this tool for modifying policies. You probably will not install System Policy Editor on most client computers.
On the client computers, enable user profiles to ensure full support for system policies. If user profiles are not enabled, only the computer settings in any system policy will be written to the registry.
Install support for group policies on the client computers if your site will use these. For more information, see "Using System Policy Editor" later in this chapter.
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/treeview/default.asp?url=/technet/prodtechnol/win98/reskit/part2/wrkc07.asp

As you see quickly, there are a number of ways to address the issues you have; the links I've provided here give you a brief overview as well as complete details on the various options.

Best of luck,
Off to work,
Asta
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war1 earned 250 total points
ID: 9806328
Wayoff1,

An easy way to disable Time and Date is to rename or delete  the file TIMEDATE.CPL, located in the Windows\System folder.

You can also use Folder Guard.

http://www.security-tips.com/disable-date-time-control-panel.htm
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by:BillDL
ID: 9810097
For more specific registry delimitations without using the policy editor, you may be able to lock down what you need by applying changes to the registry manually using the details provided at http://www.winguides.com.  You would definitely need at least one other generic user profile apart from yours to apply the changes to, and enforce the loin password to both "profiles".
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by:Wayoff1
ID: 9816551
Thanks War1,

This was a simple, easily implemented solution.  I didn't use folder guard, but merely moved the timedate file.  This should be plenty sufficient to prevent my employees from being able to mess with the clock.  This didn't work on my XP OS at home (I actually got the first blue screen I've ever had on this system), but it more than did the job on Windows 98 at work.

Thanks again!
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by:war1
ID: 9818512
Wayoff1, glad to help. :)  war1
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