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How to use /dev/lp0

Posted on 2003-11-23
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I need this urgently, so what i want is, how to use the /dev files for the parallel port, instead of the outb() or inb() functions.
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Question by:danny2408
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Karl Heinz Kremer earned 125 total points
ID: 9821873
You can either open the device file and write to it with standard file operations, or you can redirect output from commands to the /dev/lp0 device file:
cat some_file.prn > /dev/lp0

But is this really what you want? I would use a queuing system like lpr or cups. Is there a reason why you want to access the hardware directly?
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by:danny2408
ID: 9828647
I want to acces the hardware directly because is a little project i have in a subject.
The intention is to write to the paralel port and print messages on a Character LCD Display.
But is finished now, and i thankyou for your response.
Its working fine and i learn how to use the file /dev/port for the interfacing.
Again, thankyou for the response.
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