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Number of bits set in an unsigned char

Posted on 2003-11-23
2
375 Views
Last Modified: 2010-04-01
Is there a rapid way of finding the number of bits set by an unsigned char?

For example,

unsigned char c1=63; //0x3f, binary: 0011 1111
unsigned char c2=67; //0x43, binary: 0100 0011

For c1, the answer I want is 6, and for c2 the answer I want is 3.

I'm going to be doing this calculation A LOT as part of an interative analysis program, and wondered if I should just set up some array like the following. Really would love a super rapid way of evaluating this number.

....
myarray(63) = 6;
....
myarray(67) = 3;
....
myarray(255) = 8;

Thanks in advance for your help.
0
Comment
Question by:greengills
2 Comments
 
LVL 86

Accepted Solution

by:
jkr earned 75 total points
ID: 9807903
Use

unsigned char countbits ( unsigned char b) {

unsigned char mask, count;

      for ( count = 0, mask = 0x80; mask != 0; mask = ( mask >> 1)) {

            if ( b & mask) {

                  count++;
            }
      }

      return ( count);
}
0
 

Expert Comment

by:er_ramesh
ID: 9824604
Hi,

Instead of calculating number of bits set each time, Create a class and get the result quickly by passing the unsigned char as argument.

Hope the following code might be helpful.

Thanks and Regards,
Ramesh Ramasamy.

Cut and paste the appropriate portion of the code.
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
#include <stdio.h>
#pragma hdrstop

//---------------------------------------------------------------------------

class MYARRAY {
public:
    MYARRAY ();
    int operator[](unsigned char n) { return nBits[n]; }
private:
    int nBits[256];
};

MYARRAY::MYARRAY() {
    unsigned char mask, i;
    int cBits;
    for (i = 0; i <= 255; i++) {
        for (cBits = 0, mask = 0x80; mask != 0; mask = (mask >> 1)) {
            if ( i & mask) {
                cBits++;
            }
        }
        nBits[i] = cBits;
        if (i == 255) break;
    }
}

#pragma argsused
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    // Create an object
    MYARRAY MyArray;

    // Get the number of bits set by wrting the following statement.
    // MyArray[unsigned char];

    // To verify whether no. of bits are set correctly
    FILE * fp = fopen ("NoOfBits.txt", "wt");
    for (unsigned char i = 0; i <= 255; i++) {
        fprintf (fp, "char: %d = %d\n", i, MyArray[i]);
        if (i == 255) break;
    }

    return 0;
}
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
0

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