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Symantec Ghost 7.5 - Different Chipsets and how to build an image.

Posted on 2003-11-24
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Last Modified: 2012-05-04
I have a mixture or Dell GX270 and GX260 machines.  I want to build an Windows XP image that can work on both these machines (They have different Chipsets).  What is the procedure to do with with Ghost Corperate 7.5?  Is it a matter of having an image with the different drivers?  Because I have also had bluescreen problems between machines when the image already had the driver, eg different Modems and the computer would bluescreen until the modem was removed in Safe mode.

IceRaven.
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Question by:IceRaven
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by:durindil
durindil earned 50 total points
ID: 9810171
Why not just build an automated install using Windows XP?  You just need the copy of XP and you add your other drivers to the drivers directory on the installation CD that you make (or install image on a server.)  This takes more time to set up than Ghost, but when you get a new type of hardware, you just add new drivers into the directory, and can use one image for all of your machines.  Since it does take more time to set up, I do not recommend using it for installations of 10 machines or less.  As an added bonus, you will know the automated install portion of the MCSE exam inside and out.

If you have a lot of machines, you can even create an automated, distributed insatllation, and combine with an enterprise management system such as SMS, to do literally thousands of machines.  I have done this for large clients, where they had 20,000 to 25,000 desktops.
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by:IceRaven
ID: 9811029
Can the automated install, also install and configure third party software?  Where do I learn more about automated XP installs?

The network layout is about 20 groups of about 5 PC's.

IceRaven.
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by:Andrewhsia
ID: 9814594
Do not install the extra drivers. Put them in a folder on the image. Uninstall the hardware that is different, and then make the ghost. When the machine boots up the first time, it will ask for the drivers, and you can point it in the right direction. This way you can use the same image for both machines.
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by:IceRaven
ID: 9814765
What folder does windows automagically used to store all it's drivers?  So I won't have to point to them every time?

IceRaven.
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by:durindil
ID: 9815323
>>Can the automated install, also install and configure third party software?  Where do I learn more about automated XP installs?

Yes, as long as the third party software supports a "slient install."  I have install packages to put Adobe, Microsoft, WinZip, Exceed and other software on the hosts, and it does this all from a post-install script.

>>The network layout is about 20 groups of about 5 PC's.

Do you mean 100 PC's in all?  If so, I would definitely recommend automated installs over Ghost.  It's just that the changing hardware and drivers can be a pain to keep up with.  If you are talking about 5 to 20 PC's, then you could just use Ghost, as it is definitely easier to work with in the beginning.

check out this area of Microsoft's Tech Net for more information on automated deployment:

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/treeview/default.asp?url=/technet/prodtechnol/winxppro/reskit/prbc_cai_nmip.asp

It will cover using enterprise tools too, but you would want to concentrate on the cheaper methods.  You can also burn your images to bootable CD or to a network drive and just do an install that is initiated over the network.
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by:Andrewhsia
Andrewhsia earned 50 total points
ID: 9815330
you point it the first time you install the hardware, and put both drivers in the same folder. Then it will be pointing there when you boot up the image. Don't forget to uninstall just before you reboot to make the image.
Or you could try putting them in the driver folder.
I don't know the specific path for xp, but nt and 2000 is winnt/system32/driver
should be close.
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by:IceRaven
ID: 9815488
durindil - Yes I mean 100pc's total.

A deciding factor between ghost and automated installs.

I need to be able to plug my laptop into the switch and have all (or maybe some)of the PC's on that switch image themselves from the image on my laptop.  Can this be achieved using ghost/automated install?

IceRaven.
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by:IceRaven
ID: 9815499
I should also say that I don't want to have to touch the desktops drives... eg boot from a floppy, as I currently do with Ghost.

IceRaven.
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by:IceRaven
ID: 9815751
Some thoughts on unatended installations as I was browsing through

----Snip---

Disadvantages of Unattended Installation
You cannot use the unattended installation tools (Winnt32.exe and Winnt.exe) to create reference configurations that include applications and that replicate the configurations across your client computers.

Unattended installation must be initiated by someone who has direct access to each client computer.

--Snip----

So this means that I cannot use thirdpart software as I understand it and also leaves me with the same problem that I currently have with ghost... that I need to touch each computer to re-install it.

I like the idea behind an unattended installation, use an answers file to install your operating system on any hardware at all, however I am worried it isn't flexible enough to install and configure third party software.  Is there some more information that you can give me on this?

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by:durindil
ID: 9817392
As I said before, ** as long as the third party software supports a slient install or answer file, ** you can install it with an automated install.  I have worked on three large Windows 2000/XP desktop deployments, and have used automated tools to perform installs on over 40,000 desktops (total for all installs.)  This was done using SMS or Veritas NetInstall, where we did not have to go to each desktop.  These are expensive tools, however, so without them, you will have to visit each desktop.  The good thing, is that you can make one CD or CD set, or one image on a network drive, and go to each desktop and just kick off the install.  You would then have to re-visit the desktop only to get the CD or to make any user-specific changes (if you had a security office that had a special tool, for example.)
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by:Andrewhsia
ID: 9817449
I know that both PQDI and Ghost have a broadcast install type feature, but I have not used it, so I cannot help you on how to use it, but to my understanding it is for what you want, to sit at one main computer and force the others to install the image.
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by:IceRaven
ID: 9822420
The desktops are locked away in metal boxes that need to be unscrewed, so I really need a solution that does not require the computers touched.  Ghost appears to do this once the client is installed on the machines they use a virtual boot partition which means I do not need to touch the drive.  I am presumeing that SMS and Veritas NetInstall use similar technology.  Do you know of any software that would do this for around the price of Ghost?

IceRaven.
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by:durindil
ID: 9824244
If cost is your main factor, then Veritas Netinstall is the only solution near it.  Actually, Microsoft licenses Veritas Netinstall to use in their remote desktop installation.  With any of them, you will have to install a client portion to communicate with the remote server, unless your network adapters support PXE boot, and you have a boot server installed on the subnet (this is for machines that have no OS on them.)  At my current client, I did not do the desktop configuration, but they have all of the desktops (about 6,000) boot from the network and run an in-house script from a boot server to perform a desktop OS install.  Obviously, not all of them install, just the ones without an OS.  A hardware tech installs the machine, puts a password on the BIOS, and sets the boot to network boot.  If there is no OS, it will begin a network install.
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by:mrfuji
ID: 9825674
Do you have ghost console available to you?
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by:IceRaven
ID: 9827390
Yes, that is what I am currently using.

IceRaven.
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mrfuji earned 350 total points
ID: 9834448
I have never been able to get around 2 different chipsets successfully but if your new to ghost here are some basic steps using ghost console

Your best bet is to just go ahead and setup 2 images.  Setting up the silent install(suggested earlier is too much trouble.  

If these are workstations setup and connected to the network follow theses steps.
1.) Create an image of each type of machine.  Including all software that will be common to the computers.  If there are any computers that need more or less software you should create install packages with ai builder.  Make sure that you take the computers out of the domain before you create the images.  If you have xp on your image you will want to manually take the computer out of the domain then reboot the machine as opposed to allowing ghost to take the computer out of the domain.  
2.) Install the ghost client out to the machines through the ghost console.  Make sure that with console you have the appropriate network drivers for the workstations that you a setting up in the boot wizard.  
3.) Once your image and ai packages are setup within ghost you will be able to push them out in a task.
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by:Howie_Ly
ID: 9834505
I thought on windows 2000/XP systems you're required to run SYSPREP before imaging your hard drive otherwise you cannot log on?

* You can get Sysprep for XP in the XPSP1DeployTools_en.cab file microsoft site (not sure if it's still there though may have to google it).
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by:mrfuji
ID: 9841988
No, the main thing that you want done when imaging is for the sid and the name to be changed.  When setting up an imaging task through console there is a check box you can check for the sid to be changed for you.  As far as the name goes, you can set the name several different ways.

You can also run the sid changer tool (included with ghost console) manually if you want to from a boot disk.  The executable is ghstwalk.exe.
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by:Howie_Ly
ID: 9844861
Mrfuji..

> No, the main thing that you want done when imaging is for the sid
> and the name to be changed

Isn't GhostWalk symantec's version of sysprep for changing sid's??
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by:IceRaven
ID: 9845253
So what does Sysprep do and do I need to run it?

IceRaven.
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by:Howie_Ly
Howie_Ly earned 50 total points
ID: 9846884
As far as I am aware you must do the Ghostwalk or Sysprep your o/s before imaging.  Otherwise when you extract your image onto another machine it will prevent you from logging on because your hardware does not match the SID.  Sysprep removes the SID for regeneration next boot up, this is only applicable to windows nt/2000/xp if you're planning to ghost 98/me then you don't need it.

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by:mrfuji
ID: 9855917
Whoa,  Howie_Ly is not completely correct.  Sysprep does have to be run before you image but ghstwalk is only used immediatly after a computer has been imaged.
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by:IceRaven
ID: 9855922
Thanks for the clarification.

IceRaven.
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by:dsweise
ID: 10496979
I am trying something similar.  I have a GX240 Loaded with all of the applications, etc and I need the same information loaded on a room of GX260s. What do I need to do to my GX240 before I create the image so that I can Ghost it on to the GX260s or Laptops for that matter?  I know it can be done, but the last guy to do it is gone and I don't know what he did.  I'm on Windows 2000.

THanks!
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by:Pr3dator
ID: 10654552
To Easy ..

just get Sysprep and put in in the Root of the GX240 and run it. make sure u select the two options 1/ Mini setup  2/ Pnp .

that will allow the SID to be changed on each PC and also allow for the key and user details to be added for each PC.

When done u will have all computers the same and no Problem with SID's or different harware.

Easy. I do this all the time using Multicast

PS let me know how you go.
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