Replicate DNS configuration from one 2000 server to another

Hi there, everyone.

Im running a caching-only DNS server on my local network here. The server I'm running it on is having hard disc problems and its on the way out anyway. I have another 2000 server that I can start running DNS on, but I dont want to have to manually duplicate all the entries. I see that the entires are located in C:\winnt\system32\dns , and I tried copying them over, but when I installed DNS services and started it all up, those forward zones don't show up on in new servers DNS forward zones.

Is there a way to just get all these entries transferred over without having to manually re-enter them? Also, Im going to be migrating to active directory (from an NT 4.0) machine, and Im wondering what effect this might have, if any.

Thanks

-Matt
IT GalAsked:
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td_milesCommented:
If you wish to copy your DNS zones across, the easiest way is to set them up on the new server as "secondary" zones. The server will then do a zone transfer to copy all of the entries across. You can then change the zone type from secondary to primary.

Migrating to AD shouldn't have that much affect. If you are going to use a domain that you already have as the AD domain, then its type will change from STD to AD integrated.
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IT GalAuthor Commented:
The server will do this automatically? How would I go about setting them up as secondary zones? Just connect to server and bring them in?
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td_milesCommented:
See this article:
http://www.winnetmag.com/Windows/Article/ArticleID/21068/21068.html

The last heading on creating zones.

When you are creating the zone, set it as secondary and it should then ask for the primary DNS, put in the IP of your existing DNS for this. Once you finish the wizard, it will pull all of the domain data from the primary.

Your new server is now secondary DNS for all of the domains. By doing this, it will have created all of the DNS files and pulled all of the data from the primary server into these files.

Next step is to delete each of the zones from your NEW server (don't touch the old one at all). Once you have deleted the zone, choose to create a new zone and make it a primary zone. Fill in the zone name and when it asks you the question to "create a new file" or "use this existing file", choose the esitsing file. It will then use the existing file with all of the records in it.

You could also try the same by copying across the files as you did. Setting up the secondary DNS just replicates the files across, which can be useful if you physically don't have access to the DNS server to copy the files off (or if you are using two different DNS servers on different OS).
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IT GalAuthor Commented:
Well, that didnt work, unfortunately.

I went to load a new zone as secondary, like you suggested, but I got an error:

"The DNS server encountered an error while attempting to load the zone. The transfer of zone information from the master server failed. Please correct the problem then either press F5, or on the action menu click refresh"

I even just tried connecting to the other server, which worked fine, and then tried browsing to the server name in the setup of the secondary zone, but it says "the IP address(es) of this server could not be found"

Why would it not be able to determine the IP address of the server, it found it by name when I added it to the DNS snapin, and I can ping it by name as well.

Any thoughts? I had run across an mstechnet article that said to copy over a registry key to copy the zone information, but the entry they referred to doesnt exist on either of my servers.

This was the article:

http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=280061

But this key doesnt exist on my server.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\DNS\Zones

Im pretty confused now. I guess I could just manually re-enter all the zone information, but it seems like there OUGHT to be a way to do it more easily.

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td_milesCommented:
The zone transfer may have failed because the primary DNS isn't allowing zone transfers to the secondary. Zone transfers are controlled using permissinos to specify which IP addresses can do the transfer. Check this in the properties for the zones on the primary server and add your new server's IP address if necessary.

Not sure what is going on with that MS article, as I checked on a DNS server and it wasn't on mine either. I did a search through the registry and found the key:

HKLM/software/microsoft/windowsnt/currentversion/dns server/zones

that appears to contain the info they are talking about. You could try using this key in the same way that the article specifies. Make sure you make backup before you overwrite any registry settings.
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IT GalAuthor Commented:
Well, its a moot point now. The server that had the DNS information in it finally died completely (it has an IDE RAID array that the previous admin set up as a RAID0 Stripe, so when one drive failed, the whole thing failed).

Fortunately, I copied over the actual DNS files so I can rebuild it manually.

I guess I'll award the points to you, since you were the only one who actually answered at all. Thanks!
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