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how to boot the linux 8

Posted on 2003-11-25
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Last Modified: 2013-12-06
Hi,
     I have installed linux then make a bootable floppy to boot it. I successfully use it but now i have lost the this disk, how i boot the linux now with out reinstalling it.

thanks
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Question by:maimran
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by:zachad
ID: 9817944
If you have the original installation disks, you should be able to boot off of that.  Some distributions such as Red Hat have an option when booting off the CD to boot into "rescue mode" which will mount your disks. You can then re-create your boot disk once you have access to your file system.

Once inside, you can use the command 'mkbootdisk' to  create a new floppy.  

For more info on how to use 'mkbootdisk' try the following:

 # man mkbootdisk

typically, you should be able to use:

 # mkbootdisk --device /dev/fd0 <kernel-version>
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by:paullamhkg
ID: 9821995
zachad give you correct way to make another boot disk. just incase you still can't make it, you may thinking of get one from www.bootdisk.com, but you got to know which is your /boot partition.

and to know this, you can use the small linux to boot up and use the df to find out the harddisk partition status, you can get a small linux from here http://www.itm.tu-clausthal.de/~perle/hal91/

another way is try to make your harddisk linux bootable instead of using the floppy, you can use the LILO or GRUB as you boot manager, for LILO have a check here http://www.ibiblio.org/mdw/HOWTO/LILO.html using GRUB have a check here http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Multiboot-with-GRUB.html

Hope this info can help.
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Author Comment

by:maimran
ID: 9841946
zachad,

You give me very helping suggestions but I am hanged at the very last moment when this command does not work. I tries my best but still unsuccessfull. Can you tell me what is kernal-version and what is the complete command.

""# mkbootdisk --device /dev/fd0 <kernel-version>""

thanks for your cooperation
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zachad earned 50 total points
ID: 9843658

the kernel version can be found with the command 'uname -r'
if you type:

 mkbootdisk --device /dev/fd0 `uname -r`

notice that those are back-ticks around the uname -r command. They can be found on the ~ key.
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by:Karl Heinz Kremer
ID: 10306206

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